"in the sentence" vs "on the sentence"

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jctgf

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please, are both possible?
what about "in the context" and "on the context"?
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proof.beh

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Acually we have no combination like "on the sentence". So the true choice is when using the prefix In before sentence. However this will be distinct from the second combination i.e. "on the context" since it used as the same of "in the context" which both have identically a common meaning unless the use of context being meant outline then you've got to use "on" before it!

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Snowcake

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It depends on the verb or noun and their prepositions. in the sentence / on the sentence, in the context / on the context aren't phrases that are interchangeable. It's a question of prepositions. Usually, if you consider them a phrase, it's 'in the sentence' and 'in the context'.

These are examples where the prepositions are different (and maybe those which are confusing you?):

It all depends on the context.

This has an effect on the context.

The ECB's monetary policy in the context of globalisation.

This fact should be seen in the context of the vast majority.

Which word will come first in the sentence?

There have been no reported comments on the sentence from the British authorities. (please note that sentence has another meaning here than a grammatical unit. It's a judgement of guilty.)


Hope this helps,
Snowcake
 
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jctgf

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Thanks.

Regarding "on the sentence", I have found the following on BNC :

"Justice Morling's judgment determined that the statement was indeed misleading and deceptive. The judge made orders that restrained the Tobacco Institute of Australia from further publishing the advertisement and from making a number of statements based on the sentence cited above. He also ordered ..."

The tricky detail here is that "on" matches "based", right? "statements 'based on' the", right?

Summing up, is it always incorrect to say "the word ... on the sentence above", for example?

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banderas

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Thanks.

Regarding "on the sentence", I have found the following on BNC :

"Justice Morling's judgment determined that the statement was indeed misleading and deceptive. The judge made orders that restrained the Tobacco Institute of Australia from further publishing the advertisement and from making a number of statements based on the sentence cited above. He also ordered ..."

The tricky detail here is that "on" matches "based", right? "statements 'based on' the", right?

Summing up, is it always incorrect to say "the word ... on the sentence above", for example?

Thanks.
yes and yes!;-)
 

Snowcake

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I agree with Banderas. Yes and yes. :-D

It's

to base on something (as in: to depend on, to have an effect on, to have an impact on etc.)

'on' is the preposition of 'base' and not part of 'the sentence'.

Indeed, that's a bit tricky sometimes when you read a text in full and quickly. ;-)
 
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