In this reference []

ali_dd

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Hi,

Is the use of "in this reference" in the following sentences correct grammatically and conceptually? If it is not , kindly suggest ways to make it clearer.


According to Raghunathan [72], the Wells turbine having NACA aerofoil profiles of 20% thickness demonstrated the best performance compared to thinner aerofoils from the same series. Therefore, in this paper, the criteria of airfoil selection at the tip section for the VTB Wells turbine design is stated in this reference [72].
 

Tdol

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I would consider changing having to with, and am not sure what series means here. How about is the one given in Raghunathan [72]?
 

Raymott

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Or "This paper uses Raghunathan's [72] criteria for airfoil selection at the tip section for the VTB Wells turbine design."

I'm not sure what the implication of "therefore" is. Are you going to use all of Raghunathan's selection criteria simply because the 20% thickness works better?
 

Lynxear

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Hi,

According to Raghunathan [72], the Wells turbine having NACA aerofoil profiles of 20% thickness demonstrated the best performance compared to thinner aerofoils from the same series. Therefore, in this paper, the criteria of airfoil selection at the tip section for the VTB Wells turbine design is stated in this reference [72].

There are several things wrong with the way this is written.

1. "20% thickness" is a meaningless phrase. There are no dimensions to this so what is it 20% of???

2. The second sentence is weird.

Therefore, in this paper, the criteria of airfoil selection at the tip section for the VTB Wells turbine design is stated in this reference [72].

"Therefore?"... There is no conclusion arrived at in this statement. You are just stating the criteria used in the Raghunathan [72] reference.

"Therefore, in this paper," makes no sense when used in that sentence.

In answer to your question: No, it is not used properly.

You seem to be just restating the information given in the previous sentence.
 
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Polyester

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Can I use at this reference instead of in this reference?
 

Rover_KE

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Can I use "at this reference" instead of "in this reference"?
No, and please stop asking ungrammatical supplementary questions about other people's threads.
 

Tdol

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And, in academic writing, a distinction is normally made between a criterion and criteria. In ordinary usage, many happily say criteria...is, but this is not the case in very formal writing.
 

ali_dd

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There are several things wrong with the way this is written.

1. "20% thickness" is a meaningless phrase. There are no dimensions to this so what is it 20% of???

2. The second sentence is weird.

Therefore, in this paper, the criteria of airfoil selection at the tip section for the VTB Wells turbine design is stated in this reference [72].

"Therefore?"... There is no conclusion arrived at in this statement. You are just stating the criteria used in the Raghunathan [72] reference.

"Therefore, in this paper," makes no sense when used in that sentence.

In answer to your question: No, it is not used properly.

You seem to be just restating the information given in the previous sentence.


My meaning of "in this paper" is my present work.

"According to Raghunathan [72], the Wells turbine having NACA aerofoil profiles of 20% thickness demonstrated the best performance compared to thinner aerofoils from the same series. Therefore, in the present work, the criterion for airfoil selection at the tip section (NACA0020) for the VTB Wells turbine design is stated in this reference [72]."

Is it OK?
 

Tdol

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I would still change having to with and would change the end to the one given in Raghunathan [72].
 

Rover_KE

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Also answered here.
 
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