In time & On time

solace

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
Why don't you give an explanation ?
I think " in time" is a little bit sooner than "on time" but I am not sure :)
 

Red5

Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
IN or ON time for me. ;-)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
And so say most voters. ;-)
 

Firelord

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
"missed my bus", so we use "in time"
it's more ...
how to say that~~~so poor of my vocabulary level
likes "push"~
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Firelord said:
"missed my bus", so we use "in time"
it's more ...
how to say that~~~so poor of my vocabulary level
likes "push"~

Even with a "missed bus", it is correct to say "on time". :wink:
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I often use the two interchangeably. I think there is a difference though, with on time being used when the speaker has a specific time in mind.

:)
 
I

isnaini

Guest
:roll: In time is matchable with the condition of the speaker, late but tried to be there not more than the time specified.
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
isnaini said:
:roll: In time is matchable with the condition of the speaker, late but tried to be there not more than the time specified.
But if you are in time you in time you are not late.
Perhaps:
The phrase on time denotes arrival before a specific time.
The phrase in time denotes arrival before a specific event.

:)
 

Avalon

Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
Portuguese
Home Country
Brazil
Current Location
Germany
I think it´s on time since we don´t know what the person means by in time...in time for what?
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
P.S.
I am sure that Ron meant to say:
But if you are in time you are not late.
;-)
As for the question, perhaps the event the speaker was in time for was his wedding.

;-)
 

Hamburg

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
Scotland
Current Location
Germany
But if you are in time you in time you are not late.
Perhaps:
The phrase on time denotes arrival before a specific time.
The phrase in time denotes arrival before a specific event.

:)

That'll do for me ;-)

The train arrived in Hamburg on time which meant we were in time for the party.

Thanks RonBee
 
Last edited:

the player

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2006
Member Type
Student or Learner
on time ----> exactly the time of begining that thing
in time ----> just before.
after time ----> it's late :-D

That's what my english teacher has explained to us at the british centre, is it right?
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
on time ----> exactly the time of begining that thing
in time ----> just before.
after time ----> it's late :-D

That's what my english teacher has explained to us at the british centre, is it right?

I rather like my answer. :)

Say:
That's what my English teacher explained to us (or told us) at the British Centre. Is it right?

~R
 
Top