Is feature a countable noun or uncountable noun?

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3quarter

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Hi,

I'm new here. I tried to search the forum first, didn't find the answer. And
I also tried to look it up in the online webster dictionary, and didn't find it either.

Which one is correct?

This is a new feature in model 2004.
This is new featuer in model 2004.

And how can I tell a noun countable or uncountable later?

Please help me.
Thanks.
 

Casiopea

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3quarter said:
Hi,

I'm new here. I tried to search the forum first, didn't find the answer. And
I also tried to look it up in the online webster dictionary, and didn't find it either.

Which one is correct?

This is a new feature in model 2004.
This is new featuer in model 2004.

And how can I tell a noun countable or uncountable later?

Please help me.
Thanks.

This is a new feature on the 2004 model.

One feature, two features, three features, and so on. It's countable. :D
 
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3quarter

Guest
Got it. Actually should be got them. (I made so many mistakes in one sentence.)

1. Feauter is a countable noun.
2. I should use on instead of in.
3. I should use the in front of model.

Thanks very much.

And I'm a Chinese student here in USA learing computer science, so it's hard for me to tell a noun is countable or not by really count it. Do you know is there anything in the dictionary about this property?

Thanks again,
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
3quarter said:
Got it. Actually should be got them. (I made so many mistakes in one sentence.)

1. Feauter is a countable noun.
2. I should use on instead of in.
3. I should use the in front of model.

Thanks very much.

And I'm a Chinese student here in USA learing computer science, so it's hard for me to tell a noun is countable or not by really count it. Do you know is there anything in the dictionary about this property?

Thanks again,

Well, it's often that case that if you're not around the language enough it would be somewhat difficult to tell whether a noun is countable or not, simply because of differences in meaning across languages. That is, in English "fish" is countable, and yet in another language "fish" might not be countable.

Here are some strategies that might work:

1. When you come across a word that has you lost, ask yourself, "Where have I heard this word used before?" Example, "feature". We know that computers come with features, as do other electronic goods, as do human faces, and as do cars.

2. Look up the plural word on the Net. If it's there just once or twice and used in the same context, then it's suspect and probably not a possible word; however, if it's there a great deal and used in different contexts, then you know it's a possible word.

3. Do a search online for count/non-count nouns. There's usually a site or several sites devoted to providing lists of that type for ESL students. :D


All the best, :D
 
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3quarter

Guest
Casiopea said:
3quarter said:
Got it. Actually should be got them. (I made so many mistakes in one sentence.)

1. Feauter is a countable noun.
2. I should use on instead of in.
3. I should use the in front of model.

Thanks very much.

And I'm a Chinese student here in USA learing computer science, so it's hard for me to tell a noun is countable or not by really count it. Do you know is there anything in the dictionary about this property?

Thanks again,

Well, it's often that case that if you're not around the language enough it would be somewhat difficult to tell whether a noun is countable or not, simply because of differences in meaning across languages. That is, in English "fish" is countable, and yet in another language "fish" might not be countable.

Here are some strategies that might work:

1. When you come across a word that has you lost, ask yourself, "Where have I heard this word used before?" Example, "feature". We know that computers come with features, as do other electronic goods, as do human faces, and as do cars.

2. Look up the plural word on the Net. If it's there just once or twice and used in the same context, then it's suspect and probably not a possible word; however, if it's there a great deal and used in different contexts, then you know it's a possible word.

3. Do a search online for count/non-count nouns. There's usually a site or several sites devoted to providing lists of that type for ESL students. :D


All the best, :D
Wow, you're so great. I'll definitely follow your instructions in the future.
And BTW it makes me wondering what kind of work do you do? Are you a English language teacher?

Really appreciate all your help.
Best wishes,
Helen
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
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Member Type
Other
3quarter said:
Wow, you're so great. I'll definitely follow your instructions in the future. And BTW it makes me wondering what kind of work do you do? Are you a English language teacher?

Helen

Yes. I teach ESL and EFL.

Try,

it makes me wonder what kind... 8)
 
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