[Idiom] Is 'here you are' equivalent to 'thank you'?

kadioguy

Key Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2017
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Taiwan
Current Location
Taiwan
On the Wiktionary, it says:

here you are
(idiomatic) Said when you hand something over to someone or do a favour to them, usually to draw the recipient's attention to the exchange; Equivalent to “thank you” when receiving something.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/here_you_are
---------------------
I found the original source here: https://goo.gl/vBiu5a

What do you think of it?
Is 'here you are' really equivalent to 'thank you' when receiving something?

Thanks!

PS I also posted the same question on this, but all of your answers are unique to me. Hope we can discuss with each other. Thank you.
 
Last edited:

Raymott

VIP Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
English
Home Country
Australia
Current Location
Australia
No, it's quite wrong. That is what the giver says, and the receiver says "thank you".
 

teechar

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
Iraq
Current Location
Iraq
That doesn't work for me!
Also, "equivalent" should not be capitalized.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
It says "saying "here you are" when giving something is equivalent to saying "thank you" when receiving something".
 
Top