is this sentence ok?

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jctgf

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"pls before leaving to the airport check the web page xxx in order to see if the flight has left on time.
so, u don't have to wait longer than necessary at the airport."

hi,
is this sentence ok?
thanks
 

Anglika

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"Before leaving [to go to / for] the airport check the web page xxx in order to see if the flight has left on time.
This way you will not have to wait longer than necessary at the airport."
 

Offroad

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Is it "before leaving the airport" or "before leaving to the airport" ?

Thanks
 

jctgf

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the context is the following:
my wife is at home waiting the right time to leave and pick me up at the airport.
she knows what time my flight is supposed to arrive but, before leaving, I would like her to check the time on the Internet just to make sure that there is no delay.
this would keep her of staying longer than necessary at the airport (what can be extremely boring some times...).
thanks
p.s.: is this text OK? how do you say the "arrival time" of an airplane?
 

Offroad

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JC, I am not a teacher, and I can't see any error on your text, it sounds OK to ME. I'd say you are doing pretty well so far. Tell me, how long have you been at English study? Can you speak fluently?
 

banderas

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Before leaving for the airport check the webpage xxx to see whether the plane has taken off on time so that you will not have to wait longer than necessary at the airport.

It sounds ok to me though I am not English native speaker.
cheers
 

stuartnz

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"Before leaving for the airport (please) check the webpage xxx to see whether the plane has taken off on time so that you will not have to wait longer than necessary at the airport."

This sounds fine to me, a native speaker, although I'm not a teacher.
 

jctgf

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JC, I am not a teacher, and I can't see any error on your text, it sounds OK to ME. I'd say you are doing pretty well so far. Tell me, how long have you been at English study? Can you speak fluently?
hi,
no, my English is not fluent at all and my writing is extremely clumsy.
unlike most of people think, English is a very complex language and it takes a long time and a lot of effort to get there. the more we try, the closest we get but the only way to actually learn a language is immersing into it.
regards.
 

jctgf

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hi,
would the right format be "this would keep her from staying longer than necessary at the airport"?
thanks.
 

Anglika

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hi,
would the right format be "this would keep her from staying longer than necessary at the airport"?
thanks.

If you are talking about a formal text, yes.

But in a text message you can say "This means you won't have to [hang around/wait around at] the airport" - says the same but in an informal way.
 

jctgf

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thanks Anglika.
how do you say the list of times of an air company?
what about the arrival and departure time of a specific flight?
would it be the flight schedule?
can I say "please check the flight schedule on the Internet before leaving to pick me up..."?
thanks again.
 

stuartnz

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thanks Anglika.
how do you say the list of times of an air company?
what about the arrival and departure time of a specific flight?
would it be the flight schedule?
can I say "please check the flight schedule on the Internet before leaving to pick me up..."?
thanks again.

I'm not a teacher, but the phrasing you used there would be fine. You might also hear people say "check the arrivals and departures before you leave for the airport". Many airline and airport websites call that information page simply "arrivals and departures"
 

RonBee

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I'm not a teacher, but the phrasing you used there would be fine. You might also hear people say "check the arrivals and departures before you leave for the airport". Many airline and airport websites call that information page simply "arrivals and departures"
:up:
 

jctgf

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Before leaving for the airport or before going to the airport.

:)

hi,
that's what kills me! the preposition changes every time the verb changes...
isn't "leaving to" possible any way?
doesn't "to" mean "in the direction of"?
thanks
 

engee30

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isn't "leaving to" possible any way?
thanks

No, it isn't. You leave (somewhere) for somewhere else - it's just the way it is, an example of collocation, I'd say.
:cool:
 

stuartnz

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hi,
that's what kills me! the preposition changes every time the verb changes...
isn't "leaving to" possible any way?
doesn't "to" mean "in the direction of"?
thanks


I'm not a teacher, but as this thread shows, preposition use is quite idiomatic in many ways.At various times In my life I've been able to converse to some extent in Spanish, German, French, Italian and Hindi, and in every one of them my choice of prepositions (or postpositions) has always marked me as a non-native speaker. Sometimes we have to accept that the answer to "but why?" is simply "because that's the way it is"
 

Offroad

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Sometimes we have to accept that the answer to "but why?" is simply "because that's the way it is"

The best way of learning English ever :lol: !!!
 

stuartnz

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The best way of learning English ever :lol: !!!


Thanks. One of my favourite commentaries on English grammar and usage was uttered by an egg, and found in a book written by a mathematician. Chapter six of "Through The Looking Glass" by Lewis Carroll has a delightful summary of the absurdities of language, and especially the dangers of becoming too attached to the rules thereof. Here's my favourite bit:

"There's glory for you!'
`I don't know what you mean by "glory,"' Alice said.
Humpty Dumpty smiled contemptuously. `Of course you don't -- till I tell you. I meant "there's a nice knock-down argument for you!"'
`But "glory" doesn't mean "a nice knock-down argument,"' Alice objected.
`When _I_ use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, `it means just what I choose it to mean -- neither more nor less.'
`The question is,' said Alice, `whether you CAN make words mean so many different things.'
`The question is,' said Humpty Dumpty, `which is to be master - - that's all.'"


Dodgson knew the rules of language well, and used them to good effect, but I like Humpty's reminder about who should be in charge. We are the masters of our words, not the other way around. :-D
 

Offroad

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If you are a non-native speaker, don't ask why, but how.
 
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