[General] It is sad

Anil Giria

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It is sad.
It is indeed sad

I understand in 2nd sentence we used "indeed" to put more stress on "sad". Am I correct?
 

Charlie Bernstein

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It is sad.
It is indeed sad.

I understand in the second sentence we used "indeed" to put more stress on "sad". Am I correct?
Almost. It signals strong agreement.

- Me: It's too cold to walk to work today.
- You: Yes, it is, indeed.

- Me: The Beatles were a great band.
- You: Yes, indeed!

- Me: Would you like to go to the movies with me?
- You: Indeed I would!

- Me: It's a shame that the ice cream melted.
- You: It is, indeed, a shame.
 

TheParser

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NOT A TEACHER



Hello, Anil Giria:

After checking a book written by four grammarians, I should like to share some ideas with you.

1. That book says that "indeed" in your sentence is an emphasizer. It adds to the force of the adjective "sad"

2. That book says that you could also say, "It is sad indeed."

3. That book says that speakers usually say "He's very dangerous indeed" instead of simply "He's dangerous indeed."

a. So you might consider saying "It is indeed very sad" / "It is very sad indeed."



Source: A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (1985 edition) by Randolph Quirk and three other scholars. See pages 447 and 586.
 

jutfrank

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1. That book says that "indeed" in your sentence is an emphasizer. It adds to the force of the adjective "sad"

The book doesn't actually comment on the OP sentence.

I think it's much more likely to be a signal of agreement (as explained in post #3) than an emphasiser of the adjective. In that case, indeed doesn't go together with sad, it goes with It is sad.

But of course we can't be completely sure of the meaning without more context.
 

TheParser

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I think it's much more likely to be a signal of agreement (as explained in post #3) than an emphasiser of the adjective. In that case, indeed doesn't go together with sad, it goes with It is sad.

NOT A TEACHER

I have done some research in the "Books" section of Google and discovered that some writers (mostly in earlier English) used commas in order to show that they agreed with your comment that "indeed" (originally the prepositional phrase "in deed") refers to a statement.

Here are three examples (courtesy of Google "Books"):

1 "It is, indeed, sad to think that an interval of only a few days elapsed .... (British Medical Journal, 1899)

2. "It is, indeed, sad to think of the time of trial which awaits them." (The Prophetic News, 1881)

3 "It is, indeed, sad that they should have allowed themselves to be corrupted by...." (Annals and Memoirs, 1914)
 
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