it's that

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A-Is the second sentence correct in this context:
-You have been extremely kind to me.
-It's that I like you.


B-Is the second sentence correct in this context:
-He managed to come out first.
-It's that he works hard.
 

RonBee

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navi said:
A-Is the second sentence correct in this context:
-You have been extremely kind to me.
-It's that I like you.

No. Try:
  • That's because I like you.

navi said:
B-Is the second sentence correct in this context:
-He managed to come out first.
-It's that he works hard.

No. Try:
  • That's because he works hard.
Or:
  • That's because of his hard work.
Or:
  • That's because he worked so hard.

I think the second and third sentences work better than the first one.

:)
 

navi tasan

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Thanks RonBee.
I don't seem to understand when one can use "it's that" to give the reason for something. Does it always imply something negative, meaning "the problem is that"? Or is there something else? If there is no real rule, could you give me examples?
 

Casiopea

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navi tasan said:
Thanks RonBee.
I don't seem to understand when one can use "it's that" to give the reason for something. Does it always imply something negative, meaning "the problem is that"? Or is there something else? If there is no real rule, could you give me examples?

It's because I like you. (OK)
It's that I like you. (Not OK--in the given context)

'It's that' means, it's not because of that, it's because of this.

:D
 

RonBee

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Casiopea said:
navi tasan said:
Thanks RonBee.
I don't seem to understand when one can use "it's that" to give the reason for something. Does it always imply something negative, meaning "the problem is that"? Or is there something else? If there is no real rule, could you give me examples?

It's because I like you. (OK)
It's that I like you. (Not OK--in the given context)

'It's that' means, it's not because of that, it's because of this.

:D

Thanks, Cas!

:D
 

RonBee

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navi tasan said:
Thanks RonBee.
I don't seem to understand when one can use "it's that" to give the reason for something. Does it always imply something negative, meaning "the problem is that"? Or is there something else? If there is no real rule, could you give me examples?

I haven't been able to think of a rule, but you have given me something to think about. In the meantime, I suggest using the reason is that or one of the other suggestions. The it's that construction is appropriate sometimes, but context is key. (Perhaps I will do a Google search to find some examples.)

:)
 

RonBee

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Here are some examples:
  • Q: Why is Judy not going swimming?
    A: It's that time of the month.

    Q: Why are there so many shoppers in the stores?
    A: It's that time of the year for holiday buying.

    Q: Who is that?
    A: It's that guy we met at the mall.

    Q: Is it really that big?
    A: Yes, it's that big.

Of course, there are more possibilities if it is not an answer to a question.

:)
 

navi tasan

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Thanks Casiopea and RonBee.
It seems to me that Casiopea's explanation is to the point. However, I think that sometimes the "it is not that" sentence may be implied and not stated. Mostly when one wants to say: "It is not that important. It is just that... ", I think one just says the second sentence . " Just" appears quite often with "it is that", doesn't it?

For once, I have to disagree with RonBee. With all due respect, your sentences do not seem to me to have the same form as mine. "It is not that I think you are wrong, It is just that you haven't found the good examples." In these sentences there is a verb in the "that" clause.
"It is not that I know the answer. It is just that i don't think we are talking about the same case."

Here we have the verbs "know" and "are talking". In "It is that big." and "It is that guy we met in the shopping mall." there are no verbs following the noun that comes after "that".
 

Tdol

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" Just" appears quite often with "it is that", doesn't it?



I'd say yes. ;-)
 

Casiopea

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navi tasan said:
However, I think that sometimes the "it is not that" sentence may be implied and not stated. Mostly when one wants to say: "It is not that important. It is just that... ", I think one just says the second sentence . " Just" appears quite often with "it is that", doesn't it?

There's another meaning, too: It's that. I agree; but, it's more so this, than it's that.

:D
 

RonBee

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navi tasan said:
Thanks Casiopea and RonBee.
It seems to me that Casiopea's explanation is to the point. However, I think that sometimes the "it is not that" sentence may be implied and not stated. Mostly when one wants to say: "It is not that important. It is just that... ", I think one just says the second sentence . " Just" appears quite often with "it is that", doesn't it?

For once, I have to disagree with RonBee. With all due respect, your sentences do not seem to me to have the same form as mine. "It is not that I think you are wrong, It is just that you haven't found the good examples." In these sentences there is a verb in the "that" clause.
"It is not that I know the answer. It is just that i don't think we are talking about the same case."

Here we have the verbs "know" and "are talking". In "It is that big." and "It is that guy we met in the shopping mall." there are no verbs following the noun that comes after "that".

You are right that Casiopea's explanation is to the point. Also, your point about It is just that is an interesting one. In fact, I considered devising examples using It is just that. How about: "It's not that I disagree with you. It's just that I thought you should consider more options." In fact, you came up with some good examples yourself.

I didn't get my examples from the Internet. I made them up, based on sentences I found on the Web. It is true that they don't fit your scenarios, but they do show how "It is that" can be used. It's a start, perhaps. Anyhow, what I did was find an answer then think of a question to fit it. Perhaps Cas or Tdol can come up with some more useful examples.

Always feel free to disagree.

:)
 

navi tasan

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Thank you Casiopea, TDOL and specially RonBee. Casiopea's example doesn't really seem to me to fit the structure I had in mind either since there is no real "that clause", but I have to say that it is extremely smart. A very useful example of how supple language can be.
Cheers!
And MERRY CHRISTMAS everybody!!
 

RonBee

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navi tasan said:
Thank you Casiopea, TDOL and specially RonBee. Casiopea's example doesn't really seem to me to fit the structure I had in mind either since there is no real "that clause", but I have to say that it is extremely smart. A very useful example of how supple language can be.
Cheers!
And MERRY CHRISTMAS everybody!!

That's Cas all right--really smart. :wink:

It's possible that the structure you have in mind just doesn't "work", but I'm not saying that's a certainty.

These questions sometimes serve to remind me that language is not a science but an art. (At least, they would remind me of that if I had ever thought of that before.)

Merry Christmas, happy new year, and thank you for all your wonderful questions.

:D
 

Tdol

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I could reply; it's just that I'd rather wish you a Merry Xmas. ;-)
 

RonBee

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To Tdol, a cup of good cheer.
To everyone else, a happy new year.

:wink:
 

Tdol

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I'm a sot? ;-)
 

RonBee

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It only takes one cup of Christmas cheer
To make Tdol drunk until the new year.

:loling: :loling: :loling:
:loling: :loling: :loling:
 

Tdol

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RonBee

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(Ron is only kidding, folks.)

I am, in fact, quite sure that Tdol is no sot.
In fact, I have it on good authority that he is not.

:wink:
 

Casiopea

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navi tasan said:
Thank you Casiopea, TDOL and specially RonBee. Casiopea's example doesn't really seem to me to fit the structure I had in mind either since there is no real "that clause", but I have to say that it is extremely smart. A very useful example of how supple language can be.
Cheers!
And MERRY CHRISTMAS everybody!!

You're welcome.

If it's a 'that' clause you're looking for, try this,

A-You have been extremely kind to me.
-The reason for that is (that) I like you.

B-He managed to come out first.
-The reason for that is (that) he works hard.

:D
 
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