knock this chip off your shoulder

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ionutzavram

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"knock this chip off your shoulder" here means to accept a challange?





Car dealers feel that somebody who comes in is better than somebody who calls in. They will spend time with you before they give you a price. Part of the reason they go through all the seemingly B.S. conversation for the half hour or so is it gets you more qualified. At any point, it'salmost like it's a dare. "You knock this chip off your shoulder and leave," because they know thatevery minute or hour more that you spend talking to them means you're more invested in the deal.
 

vil

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Attention: I'm not a teacher.



Dear ionutzavram,

Your speculation regarding the idiom in question is right enough.

The phrase chip on one's shoulder means having a harbored grievance or sense of inferiority and being quick to take offence.

If someone has a chip on their shoulder, they are resentful about something and feel that they have been treated badly.

Carrying a chip on one's shoulder was a form of challenge in the same spirit as a medieval knight throwing down his gauntlet. If an opponent picked up the glove, or knocked the chip of wood off their shoulder, the challenge was accepted and the fight was on.

Regards.

V.
 

jctgf

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Hi,
Can this expression also be used to convey the idea of overcoming a fall and getting ready to carry on? For example:
"John was devastated with his gandmother sudden death, but was strong enough to knock the chips off his shoulder and...".
Thanks,
jc
 

susiedqq

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Car dealers feel that somebody who comes in is better than somebody who calls in. They will spend time with you before they give you a price. Part of the reason they go through all the seemingly B.S. conversation for the half hour or so is it gets you more qualified. At any point, it'salmost like it's a dare. "You knock this chip off your shoulder and leave," because they know thatevery minute or hour more that you spend talking to them means you're more invested in the deal.


I think . . .
This is about "sales dynamics" or selling techniques between a car dealer (saleperson) and the customer. It is talking to the salesperson: the customer will ask many questions and take up much time, but that's OK because it also bonds the salesperson to the customer.

So . . . the customer can be irritating at times, which might make the salesperson angry and resentful. But the saleperson must "knock this chip (these feelings) off your shoulder" because the customer knows that all the time the salesperson spends with them, makes for a relationship. And that's how sales are made! :lol:
 
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