lawyer

AirbusA321

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What are the differences between these terms?

lawyer
attorney
solicitor
barrister
advocate
mouthpiece
counselor-at-law
 

Raymott

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Have you considered a dictionary first?

A mouthpiece is what you put in your mouth to protect your teeth during sports. This does not apply to any other of your words.
 

AirbusA321

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The online dictionary says that they all mean the same. ("Rechtsanwalt" in German, "avocat" in French)
 

emsr2d2

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For me, "mouthpiece" is another word for "spokesperson". A spokesperson might also happen to be a lawyer/solicitor/barrister etc, but they don't mean the same thing.
 

Raymott

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The terms are used differently in different places. The first four are qualified lawyers.
In Australia, a solicitor does office type work; a barrister appears in court.
You can be an advocate for something with no legal qualifications.
I don't know what a counselor-at-law is.

Maybe if you tried a legal dictionary?:
http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/attorney
 

andrewg927

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I have not heard of barrister, mouth piece or counselor-at-law. I have heard of attorney-at law but I'm not sure what it means. To me attorney and lawyer are the same thing.
 
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emsr2d2

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The first Google hit for "definition of barrister" does show the word to be chiefly British but Wikipedia has a paragraph on barristers in the US.
 

andrewg927

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It's possible that we have barristers in the US but most people wouldn't know what they do.
 

Tdol

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In Australia, a solicitor does office type work; a barrister appears in court.

In the UK, solicitors can do court work, but at the higher levels, barristers are brought in.
 
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