linearization techniques often involve calculus

GoesStation

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Contain isn't possible. Require would work in place of involve with a similar meaning. This definition for "involve" works in this context: include (something) as a necessary part.

Write The context is mathematics.
 

hhtt21

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Contain isn't possible. Require would work in place of involve with a similar meaning. This definition for "involve" works in this context: include (something) as a necessary part.

Write The context is mathematics.


But are not include and contain the same things?

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But are not include and contain the same things?
You really need to rely more on reading and less on dictionaries. While include can sometimes replace contain and vice versa, they are not perfect synonyms. Few pairs of words are.

The definition of "involve" that I cited says "include (something) as a necessary part." That means it might be possible to replace "often involve calculus" with "often include calculus as a necessary part." You can't jump from there to the conclusion that "include" and "contain" mean exactly the same thing.
 
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hhtt21

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You really need to rely more on reading and less on dictionaries. While include can sometimes replace contain and vice versa, they are not perfect synonyms. Few pairs of words are.


How can you distinguish between them for this example?

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Contain doesn't have the sense of necessity that require and, to a lesser extent, involve have. It states a passive condition where the other two verbs evoke an active one.
 

hhtt21

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Contain doesn't have the sense of necessity that require and, to a lesser extent, involve have. It states a passive condition where the other two verbs evoke an active one.


But what is the difference between contain and involve? Are not they the same?

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GoesStation

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A barrel passively contains beer; the beer is located in the barrel. The act of brewing actively involves fermentation: the yeast has to digest sugars and produce alcohol.

Contain has another, active sense: an oil boom actively contains oil to prevent it from spreading.
 

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How can you evaluate include and contain from respect of activity/passivity?

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Think of contain to mean 'hold within the limits of'. A container has something inside it.
 

GoesStation

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How can you evaluate include and contain
with [STRIKE]from[/STRIKE] respect [STRIKE]of[/STRIKE] to activity/passivity?
See above. Read a lot of English texts. With experience, you will soon intuitively know which word is natural.
 

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Uhhhhhh, ---- a question if you don't mind. Is your basic objective here to learn about the nitty-gritty and the minutia of the English language, or is it to understand AND apply the linearization techniques which involve the calculus? If it is the former why did you send me a personal message asking me if I could help you in your mechanical engineering studies? My reply was: "Of course." Also, if it is the former, why pick your questions about English from a 'numerical analysis' text when the number of other sources approaches infinity? GS gave you an excellent answer above. Now you can get back to drawing straight line segments to approximate a curve.

Yes, my objective here in this forum to learn about English. But English is also used in the technical field and this is my biggest motivation to learn it. Yes, I sent you a private message about asking questions. It was about technical question not about language. I thought I can take help from you about technical fields. I pick questions from textbooks because I first want to understand them. Literature comes second. Textbooks are the first? Is it O.K now? My objective here is to understand the sentences so that I can understand the techniques.

Thank you.
 

hhtt21

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Yes, it is OK. I just sent you a PM answering your questions about 'simultaneous equations'. When it comes to this aspect it might be better to use the PM feature. Others are not interested in too much technical detail and the name of the site is 'using English'.

Yes but I tried to discuss involve, contain and include via the example of "linearization techniques often involve calculus." This not require too much technical knowledge. I do not ask about how linearization can be performed or what calculus is. I think most people could have heard of this concepts. There might be doctors, engineers, mathematicians, physicists here. As they know the English very well, they can explain best.
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hhtt21

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Yes, it is OK. I just sent you a PM answering your questions about 'simultaneous equations'. When it comes to this aspect it might be better to use the PM feature. Others are not interested in too much technical detail and the name of the site is 'using English'.
Would you please explain what "when it comes to this aspect" means? Does aspect here mean situation?

Thank you.
 

GoesStation

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Would you please explain what "when it comes to this aspect" means? Does aspect here mean situation?
Yes, near enough. "When it comes to" means with respect to or concerning.
 
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