lint stuff or lenitive stuff?

gamboler

Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2010
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Spanish
Home Country
Spain
Current Location
Spain
This is the dialogue from a British movie, released in 1961:

- Where do you keep the ____ stuff?
- It's up there.
- What dou you think we ought to use, iodine, disinfectant or what?

It's clear he is asking his wife for the first aid kit.

Which one of the words make sense here, lint or lenitive? I guess it's colloquial or slang.
Please, see the attached audio clip.
Thanks in advance.
 

Attachments

  • Stuff01.mp3
    253.5 KB · Views: 7

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
I'm at work so I can't listen to the recording but "lint" makes sense. As far as I know, "lenitive" isn't even a word. Does the person perhaps say "lint and stuff"?

See definition 1 HERE.
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
OK, thanks, I'd never heard of it and didn't have time to look it up.
 

Roman55

Key Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2014
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Italy
Current Location
France
He asks, "Where do you keep the lint and stuff?"
 

Roman55

Key Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2014
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Italy
Current Location
France
According to this dictionary, lenitive is archaic and it's a laxative, which is one way of alleviating pain I suppose.
 

Charlie Bernstein

VIP Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2009
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
It does sound like "lint and stuff." But what does it mean? Is lint British English for cotton balls or something?
 

gamboler

Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2010
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Spanish
Home Country
Spain
Current Location
Spain
From the Oxford dictionary:
lint: A fabric, originally of linen, with a raised nap on one side, used for dressing wounds.‘he smeared ointment on a strip of lint’
Link:
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/lint
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
It does sound like "lint and stuff." But what does it mean? Is lint British English for cotton balls or something?

As I said in post #2, there is a BrE definition that fits perfectly.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
I heard lint 'n' stuff.
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
We have a small plastic-wrapped package of lint in our first-aid box at work. It's marked "Lint Dressing".
 
Top