"lite" or "Light"?

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gil45

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Feb 14, 2008
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Hi,

Can I write "Lite" Instead of "Light"?

WORD and another grammar software that I have indicate "Lite" as misspelling, however it suggests "Light" instead....
Do American sometimes use "Lite" while British always use "Light"?

Thanks,

gilbert.
 

Ouisch

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"Lite" is usually only used to refer to something that is a less potent version of the original. For example, Lite Beer (Miller Lite, Bud Lite) contains less calories than regular beer. Lite FM is a radio station that plays "soft" rock hits.
 

rewboss

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"Lite" is a phonetic spelling used in brand names, but is still considered illiterate in most other contexts.

Spellings like this were very popular a few decades ago: "Kwik" for "Quick", "Nite" for "Night" and so on. They're not used so much now, but you will still see them. "Kwik-E-Mart" is a name for a fictional chain of grocery stores in the Simpsons, and is typical of names that used to be common (in fact, until recently, there was a chain in the UK called "Kwik Save"). One of the products sold at Kwik-E-Mart is called "Krusty-Os" -- "krusty" instead of "crusty".

Use these humorous spellings when writing brand names (such as "Bud Lite"), but otherwise it's best to use the traditional spellings ("It's a very light beer").
 

riverkid

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Aug 17, 2006
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Hi,

Can I write "Lite" Instead of "Light"?

WORD and another grammar software that I have indicate "Lite" as misspelling, however it suggests "Light" instead....
Do American sometimes use "Lite" while British always use "Light"?

Thanks,

gilbert.

'lite' is used in the window industry to describe the individual panes of windows.

It's also used in this fashion.

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M-W

Main Entry:
lite
Pronunciation:
\ˈlīt\
Function:
adjective

1: diminished or lacking in substance or seriousness <lite news>; specifically : being an innocuous or unthreatening version —often used postpositively <it is film noir lite — James Greenberg>

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