literally and ironically

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billy

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Hello,

help me with those two words above. I want to know in what stiuation we use them.




I appreciate it
 

MikeNewYork

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billy said:
Hello,

help me with those two words above. I want to know in what stiuation we use them.




I appreciate it

Both words are adverbs.

Ironically means in a way that was completely unexpected.

John studied most of the night for an important examination. Ironically, this caused him to oversleep and miss the exam.

Literally means exactly as written or in the strictest interpretation of what was said or written. Unfortunately, "literally" is often used in a way that is opposite to its meaning.

When the boss asks for you to come to his office in five minutes, he means it lterally. (normal use)

Even though John came up with the best presentation, the boss literally threw him to the wolves. (usage problem - there were no wolves in the room).
 

MikeNewYork

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billy said:
thank you so much for the explanation!

You're welcome, Billy. :wink:
 

Tdol

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That use of 'literally' annoys me- it literally drives me mad. :lol:
 

MikeNewYork

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tdol said:
That use of 'literally' annoys me- it literally drives me mad. :lol:

I also find it annoying. It literally pushes me over the edge. :wink:
 

Tdol

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That and 'to coin a phrase' as a way of introducing a cliche. <grrrrrrr> ;-)
 

MikeNewYork

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tdol said:
That and 'to coin a phrase' as a way of introducing a cliche. <grrrrrrr> ;-)

That's even worse. :roll:
 
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