[Grammar] literally meaning “Friday Bazaar”

Sarah-Betty

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The Tehran Jomeh Bazaar, literally meaning “Friday Bazaar”, which is comparable to Portobello Road in London, is a popular street flea market held every Friday morning in an empty multi-story car park on Jomhuri Street, not far from Saa’di Metro Station.

Source: It was written by a non-native teacher (PDF file)

1) Does the first underlined part mean "which literally means"?
2) I am not sure which one is correct "street flea market" or "flea street market".
 

Rover_KE

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1) Yes.

2) Neither is colloquial: 'street' and 'flea' are not used together. A street market is held in a street – not a multi-storey car park. A flea market can be held anywhere.
 

Sarah-Betty

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Neither is colloquial: 'street' and 'flea' are not used together.
Thank you so much. I didn't know about that difference.

Now, in the source mentioned there are two sentences including "street market" as well.
I think I have to substitute the words "street market" with something like "the market", "this flea market" or "an open-air market".


I’m going to describe [STRIKE]a street market [/STRIKE] a flea market / an open-air market that I’ve enjoyed visiting many times in Tehran.
This [STRIKE]street market[/STRIKE] market is a jewel for those who like the thrill of hunting down treasures.
 
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Tarheel

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I would say:

hunting for treasures
 

Tdol

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From the photos in Google images, it does not look much like a flea market to me.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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If it's in a garage, it's not open-air. A street market is open-air. A garage market is enclosed.

A flea market can be indoors or outdoors. It's simply a place where people gather to buy and sell old, used things. There is no new merchandise.

The expression flea market is a kind of joke. When you buy things at a flea market, you're really shopping for fleas, because old, used things are full of fleas.
 

Sarah-Betty

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You are right. The Tehran Jomeh Bazaar is located inside an empty multi-story car park. It is enclosed not an open-air. This market sells both used and new things. So, what does this type of market is called in English?
 
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GoesStation

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Although we don't use the word much, you can just call it a bazaar. Anglophones will probably know that that's an informal marketplace full of small shops or stalls, and the word has an appealing air of exoticism to us.
 

Tarheel

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Say:

What is this type of market called in English?
 

GoesStation

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You are right. The Tehran Jomeh Bazaar is located inside an empty multi-story car park. It is enclosed not [STRIKE]an[/STRIKE] open-air. This market sells both used and new things. So, what is [STRIKE]does[/STRIKE] this type of market [STRIKE]is[/STRIKE] called in English?
Adding to my previous post, you can also call it a market, as you already have. :)

Note the correct way to form a question. We invert the main verb when it's a modal or a helping verb like "to be", "to have", or "to do". Otherwise we add the helping verb "to do" and invert it.

Question with helping verb or modal: What is this type of market called in English? What should I call it in English?
Statement: This type of market is called a bazaar in English. You should call it a bazaar.

Question with other verbs: What do you say in English?
Statement: You say bazaar.
 
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