Make an appointment with the doctor or to see the doctor?

Sammy Sam

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If someone isn't feeling well and wants to schedule a meeting with a doctor to get herself examined then what would be the best way for her to get an appointment on the phone?

I want to make an appointment with the doctor.

I want to make an appointment to see the doctor.
 

probus

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It's six of one and half a dozen of the other. In other words, both are equally correct and equally common in my variety of English.
 

tedmc

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I think it's more polite to replace "want" with "would like".
 
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Rover_KE

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In the UK at present, we’re encouraged to stipulate whether we want a FaceTime, phone, or face-to-face consultation with our GPs.
 

Sammy Sam

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In the UK at present, we’re encouraged to stipulate whether we want a FaceTime, phone, or face-to-face consultation with our GPs.
GP sounds like "general physician" or "general practitioner". Am I right?
 

emsr2d2

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In what country is this person hoping to get an appointment?

In the UK, when we phone the practice to make an appointment, we don't usually specify that we want to see a doctor (we would specify if we just want to see the practice nurse or get a blood test). The simplest thing to say is "Hi. I'd like to make an appointment please". The receptionist will then offer either a phone consultation, a video consultation or a face-to-face consultation. At that point, the caller would choose what type of appointment they are hoping for.
 

Sammy Sam

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In what country is this person hoping to get an appointment?

In the UK, when we phone the practice to make an appointment, we don't usually specify that we want to see a doctor (we would specify if we just want to see the practice nurse or get a blood test). The simplest thing to say is "Hi. I'd like to make an appointment please". The receptionist will then offer either a phone consultation, a video consultation or a face-to-face consultation. At that point, the caller would choose what type of appointment they are hoping for.
That's very helpful. Can you elaborate a little bit more on it please? Like if someone in the UK directly wants to make an appointment for a face-to-face consultation then can she say

I would like to make face-to-face appointment with the doctor.

Is the above statement acceptable?
 

tedmc

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make an appointment to see the doctor in person
 
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emsr2d2

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That's very helpful. Can you elaborate a little bit more on it please? Like For example, if someone in the UK directly wants to make an appointment for a face-to-face consultation, then can she they say the following?

I would like to make a face-to-face appointment with the doctor.

Is the above statement acceptable?
See above. I'm not sure why you keep saying "someone" and then following it with "she". If you're just talking about people in general, use the non-specific pronoun "they".
With the addition of the indefinite article, your suggested sentence is OK.
 
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