Married or otherwise?

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Eway

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In this sentence:

Johnson lived a rock-and-roll lifestyle and was no stranger to liquor, gambling and women - married or otherwise.

Does "married or otherwise" refer to "women" or Johnson?
 

MikeNewYork

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Eway said:
In this sentence:

Johnson lived a rock-and-roll lifestyle and was no stranger to liquor, gambling and women - married or otherwise.

Does "married or otherwise" refer to "women" or Johnson?

That refers to "women". :wink:
 

Tdol

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Johnson, married or therwise, lived a rock and roll lifestyle???? :lol:
 

Eway

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tdol said:
Johnson, married or therwise, lived a rock and roll lifestyle???? :lol:

But...can't it mean "Johnson, married or otherwise, is no stranger to women"?
 

Tdol

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The way I have phrased it suggests, IMO, that Johnson enjoyed the lifestyle both when he was married and when single, and, yes, I do think here the emphasis would be on relations with women rather than chemicals. ;-)
 

Eway

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tdol said:
The way I have phrased it suggests, IMO, that Johnson enjoyed the lifestyle both when he was married and when single, and, yes, I do think here the emphasis would be on relations with women rather than chemicals. ;-)


???
What does IMO stand for?
And what do those "chemicals" refer to?
Tdol, I don't understand your humor... :?

And...how to tell that "married or otherse" refers to Johnson or women?
 
I

ITIK

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IMO stand for ''In My Opinion''

(others .. FYI = For your information, BTW = By the way)


Johnson lived a rock-and-roll lifestyle and was no stranger to liquor, gambling and women - married or otherwise

I think it is for ''women''. (same like Mike)

Meaning ... he like to have an affair with any kind of women. He don't care whether the women married or single (opposite for married).
 

Tdol

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Eway said:
tdol said:
The way I have phrased it suggests, IMO, that Johnson enjoyed the lifestyle both when he was married and when single, and, yes, I do think here the emphasis would be on relations with women rather than chemicals. ;-)


???
What does IMO stand for?
And what do those "chemicals" refer to?
Tdol, I don't understand your humor... :?

And...how to tell that "married or otherse" refers to Johnson or women?

Chemicals= drugs, a staple of rock and roll lifestyles.

You can tell who 'married or otherwise' refers to from its position in the sentence- to make it modify him, I moverd it nearer. ';-)
 

Casiopea

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Eway said:
In this sentence:

Johnson lived a rock-and-roll lifestyle and was no stranger to liquor, gambling and women - married or otherwise.

Does "married or otherwise" refer to "women" or Johnson?

I agree with Mike's response. If 'married and otherwise' were modifying 'Johnson', then it would be in closer proximity to that noun.

Johnson lives a rock-and-roll lifestyle and was no stranger--married or otherwise--to liquor, gambling and women.

The writer place 'married or otherwise' directly after 'women' in order to modify 'women' with extra information. In other words,

Johnson was no stranger to married women.

In short, the writer is suggesting that a person (i.e. Johnson) who drinks, gambles, and dates married women lacks morals).
 

RonBee

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Casiopea said:
In short, the writer is suggesting that a person (i.e. Johnson) who drinks, gambles, and dates married women lacks morals).

At any rate, he is suggesting that that is part of a rock and roll lifestyle.

:wink:
 

Casiopea

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RonBee said:
Casiopea said:
In short, the writer is suggesting that a person (i.e. Johnson) who drinks, gambles, and dates married women lacks morals).

At any rate, he is suggesting that that is part of a rock and roll lifestyle.

:wink:

Maybe that's where the term "get your rocks off" came from. :wink:
 

MikeNewYork

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Casiopea said:
Eway said:
In this sentence:

Johnson lived a rock-and-roll lifestyle and was no stranger to liquor, gambling and women - married or otherwise.

Does "married or otherwise" refer to "women" or Johnson?

I agree with Mike's response. If 'married and otherwise' were modifying 'Johnson', then it would be in closer proximity to that noun.

Johnson lives a rock-and-roll lifestyle and was no stranger--married or otherwise--to liquor, gambling and women.

The writer place 'married or otherwise' directly after 'women' in order to modify 'women' with extra information. In other words,

Johnson was no stranger to married women.

In short, the writer is suggesting that a person (i.e. Johnson) who drinks, gambles, and dates married women lacks morals).

Excellent answer! 8)
 

henry

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'Don't leave me in a lurch' is a correct usage.

'grind rice into flour' is a direct translation by Cas, and I find it quite funny. :lol:

Hope I don't let you down. :wink:
 

blacknomi

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henry said:
'Don't leave me in a lurch' is a correct usage.

'grind rice into flour' is a direct translation by Cas, and I find it quite funny. :lol:

Hope I don't let you down. :wink:


Not at all. Henry, thank you very much indeed. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

I know the literal meaning of "grind rice into flour". I was wondering if it would probably has metaphorical reference which might be considered as "Thanks" or something, written as a reply to Mike's previous post "Excellent answer!". Now,I got you. It's merely a direct literal translation.

Thanks again.
 
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