Masters course vs. Course for a Master's degree

Status
Not open for further replies.

robotron

New member
Joined
Jun 15, 2013
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Croatian
Home Country
Croatia
Current Location
Croatia
Hello!

I have the following part of a sentence:
Code:
benefit from taking a [B]masters course[/B] in...

Would it be better/correct to say "course for a Master's degree in"? Or maybe some third option?

Thank you!
robotron
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
A third option would be '...would benefit from taking a master's in sociology.'

(Some people would prefer to capitalise Master's.)

Rover
 
Last edited:

robotron

New member
Joined
Jun 15, 2013
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Croatian
Home Country
Croatia
Current Location
Croatia
A third option would be '...would benefit from taking a master's in sociology.'

(Some people would prefer to capitalise Master's.)

Rover

The intent is to make it sound professional. I'd like to avoid colloquial phrases and have an official tone, but it's hard for me to discern from the various possibilities because I'm not a native English speaker.

What do you think?
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
In that case, say 'would benefit from taking a Master's degree course in...'
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top