me either or me neither

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Hi, I'm Ji-seon living in Seoul, Korea.
I've learned that I can use 'me either' when I'd like to agree to someone's statement that includes 'not': If A says "I don't like this.", I can say "Neither do I" or "me either". But my friend told me that "me either" is American English. In addtion to it, the other friend told me that "me either" is not correct in grammar and that I should say "me neither". Now I'm lost. Would you please help me?
Thank you in advance.
 

geneticist

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me either and me neither are both correct and informal,although the first one is american english
i donot like it
me either
or
me neither
 

2006

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Hi, I'm Ji-seon living in Seoul, Korea.
I've learned that I can use 'me either' when I'd like to agree to someone's statement that includes 'not': If A says "I don't like this.", I can say "Neither do I" or "me either". But my friend told me that "me either" is American English. In addtion to it, the other friend told me that "me either" :cross: is not correct in grammar and that I should say "me neither". :tick: Now I'm lost. Would you please help me? "me either" is illogical.
Thank you in advance.
2006
 

riverkid

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Hi, I'm Ji-seon living in Seoul, Korea.
I've learned that I can use 'me either' when I'd like to agree to someone's statement that includes 'not': If A says "I don't like this.", I can say "Neither do I" or "me either". But my friend told me that "me either" is American English. In addtion to it, the other friend told me that "me either" is not correct in grammar and that I should say "me neither". Now I'm lost. Would you please help me?
Thank you in advance.

Both are fine for informal, everyday language use, Ji-seon. 'me either' means exactly the same thing as 'me neither'. If it were illogical, nobody would understand. Everyone understands, and both are used, seemingly, 'me either' is much more common than 'me neither'.

US region google search -
Results 1 - 10 of about 4,740,000 English pages for "me either"

Results 1 - 10 of about 1,920,000 English pages for "me neither".

Canada region google search -

Results 1 - 10 of about 38,600 English pages for "me neither".

Results 1 - 10 of about 74,100 English pages for "me either".
 

2006

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Both are fine for informal, everyday language use, Ji-seon. 'me either' means exactly the same thing as 'me neither'. If it were illogical, nobody would understand. Everyone understands, and both are used, seemingly, 'me either' is much more common than 'me neither'.

Here, "illogical" has nothing to do with understanding. It has to do with what clearly makes more sense. Here is another example.
A...I didn't like that movie.
B...Neither did I. (logical because it contains a negative word)
B...Either did I. (illogical)


2006
 

riverkid

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Here, "illogical" has nothing to do with understanding. It has to do with what clearly makes more sense. Here is another example.
A...I didn't like that movie.
B...Neither did I. (logical because it contains a negative word)
B...Either did I. (illogical)


2006

Logical has everything to do with understanding, 2006, because languages create their own logic. The prescriptivists missed this with their poor analysis of the double negative. There are many idioms that make no sense to ESLs but they work perfectly for native speakers.

You've set out an example, above, that is unnatural. The issue for this thread was 'me either'. And it's perfectly natural in language to use ellipsis, is it not?

We could switch your example around,


A:I liked that movie.

B: Neither did I.


and have what appears to be an illogical answer, yet it is perfectly understandable and what's more important, it says something different, it creates a language nuance.
 

2006

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Logical has everything to do with understanding, 2006, because languages create their own logic. The prescriptivists missed this with their poor analysis of the double negative. Garbage! There are many idioms that make no sense to ESLs but they work perfectly for native speakers. Don't change the subject; we aren't talking about idioms.

You've set out an example, above, that is unnatural. Not unnatural at all to people who speak correct standard English.The issue for this thread was 'me either'. And it's perfectly natural in language to use ellipsis, is it not? Don't be ridiculous! Saying "me either" instead of 'me neither' is not an ellipsis; it's just bad English.
I suppose to you, 'Neither one would work.' and 'Either one would work.' mean the same thing.

We could switch your example around,


A:I liked that movie.

B: Neither did I.
If you want to speak confused garbage English, go ahead but you shouldn't spread it around at an ESL site. Get lost!
and have what appears to be an illogical answer, yet it is perfectly understandable and what's more important, it says something different, it creates a language nuance.
2006
 

Grablevskij

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Me too.
Me neither.

My choice.

Michael
 

riverkid

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riverkid
Logical has everything to do with understanding, 2006, because languages create their own logic. The prescriptivists missed this with their poor analysis of the double negative.

2006 replied: Garbage!

Do you then consider the prescriptive argument on double negatives a good argument, 2006?

riverkid
There are many idioms that make no sense to ESLs but they work perfectly for native speakers.

2006 replied: Don't change the subject; we aren't talking about idioms.

No, we were discussing the issue of logic in language. I pointed out that languages create their own logic. You haven't addressed this. [That's the second thing you haven't addressed.]

riverkid
You've set out an example, above, that is unnatural.

2006 replied: Not unnatural at all to people who speak correct standard English.

The third thing.

US region google search -
Results 1 - 10 of about 4,740,000 English pages for "me either"

Results 1 - 10 of about 1,920,000 English pages for "me neither".

Canada region google search -

Results 1 - 10 of about 38,600 English pages for "me neither".

Results 1 - 10 of about 74,100 English pages for "me either".

As we can plainly see, if one is willing to address the truth, it that 'me either' outnumbers 'me neither' by a rather large margin.


riverkid
The issue for this thread was 'me either'. And it's perfectly natural in language to use ellipsis, is it not?

2006 replied:
Don't be ridiculous! Saying "me either" instead of 'me neither' is not an ellipsis; it's just bad English.
I suppose to you, 'Neither one would work.' and 'Either one would work.' mean the same thing.

You've actually addressed an issue, not that I'm counting. :)

In the situation you've set out above, no, they do not mean the same thing. Not at all a surprising turn of events for a language that depend so much on word order for meaning.

Are you suggesting that, in the following dialogue, B's and C's replies are different in meaning?

A: I don't like pizza.

B: Me either.

C: Me neither.


riverkid
We could switch your example around,

A:I liked that movie.

B: Neither did I.

and have what appears to be an illogical answer, yet it is perfectly understandable and what's more important, it says something different, it creates a language nuance.

2006 replied:
If you want to speak confused garbage English, go ahead but you shouldn't spread it around at an ESL site. Get lost!

What are we at now, 2006, 4, 5, 2006, whatever.

Do you deny that there is no way that B can reply with a "Neither did I" to A's statement?
 
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2006

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Do you deny that there is no way that B can reply with a "Neither did I" to A's statement?

Don't be such a raving idiot!! People like you can say anything they want and can claim all manner of meaning and nuance for it. But it is not acceptable English, and learners of English should not be exposed to such garbage. And I don't care how many hits you can find on google. (Is that where you 'learned' English?)

I have nothing more to say to you about this.
 

riverkid

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Don't be such a raving idiot!! People like you can say anything they want and can claim all manner of meaning and nuance for it.

But it is not acceptable English, and learners of English should not be exposed to such garbage. And I don't care how many hits you can find on google. (Is that where you 'learned' English?)

I have nothing more to say to you about this.

I didn't find any hits for that particular dialogue, 2006. But it certainly is a possibility as a preemptive answer, meaning a number of things. That much is undeniable.

You missed this one too, 2006, the central issue of the thread;

riverkid

Are you suggesting that, in the following dialogue, B's and C's replies are different in meaning?

A: I don't like pizza.

B: Me either.

C: Me neither.
 

supada

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I've followed threads about either and neither but still not clear yet because native speakers' strong discussions. :-D

A : I don't like this movie.

Me : Me either.

Then A told me I used wrong grammar. I still doubt it. ;-)
 

Barb_D

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I've followed threads about either and neither but still not clear yet because native speakers' strong discussions. :-D

A : I don't like this movie.

Me : Me either.

Then A told me I used wrong grammar. I still doubt it. ;-)

I'm not surprised that you're confused, considering the ranting and raving of the people in this thread.

In response to a negative statement (I didn't like it. He doesn't like her. She didn't go.)

More formal: Neither did I. or I didn't either.
Informal: Me neither
Informal: Me either (yes, it's illogical, but it would be quite well understood)
Wrong: Me too.

Others have said that "me either" is North American only. Since that's where I live, that's what I hear.
 

2006

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i'm not surprised that you're confused, considering the ranting and raving of the people in this thread. i don't know if the r and r was confusing, but the suggestion that "me either" is just as logical as "me neither" would be confusing.

in response to a negative statement (i didn't like it. He doesn't like her. She didn't go.)

more formal: Neither did i. Or i didn't either.
Informal: Me neither
informal: Me either (yes, it's illogical, but it would be quite well understood)
but something like 'i ain't never seen nothin like that before.' would be quite well understood too.

wrong: Me too. but "me too" is just as understandable as "me either". i guess since you say/hear "me either" it sounds more acceptable than "me too" to you. :)
2006
 
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supada

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Thanks a lot everyone. I have one more question about this.

How about if I want to mention someone else's response.
A : I don't like this movie.

Me : Me neither.

Her : She didn't like it as well. Can I say "her neither"? or I have to say something else.

Please help. : )
 

Barb_D

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This is odd.
While "me neither" sounds informal but not wrong, "her neither" sounds uneducated (to my ear).

Try: "She didn't either."
 

supada

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Thank you everyone. :-D
 

jomo27

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Could you please write down examples of using either and neither?



Thanks!
 
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