'Miscellaneous'

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Mehrgan

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Hi all,

Would it be right to use 'juxtaposition' in a sentence in which the adjective 'miscellaneous' was used?

In this CD you can find miscellaneous tracks (of various styles).
In this CD you will find a juxtaposition of various tracks.

My interpretation is, though not mentioned in my dictionary, 'juxtaposition' may suggest the collection is a bit odd in which the items are not, perhaps, logically selected, or at least one wouldn't expect such a selection of items.

I would really appreciate any help. Thanks!
 

billmcd

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Hi all,

Would it be right to use 'juxtaposition' in a sentence in which the adjective 'miscellaneous' was used?

In this CD you can find miscellaneous tracks (of various styles).
In this CD you will find a juxtaposition of various tracks.

My interpretation is, though not mentioned in my dictionary, 'juxtaposition' may suggest the collection is a bit odd in which the items are not, perhaps, logically selected, or at least one wouldn't expect such a selection of items.

I would really appreciate any help. Thanks!

In general 'juxtaposition' refers to entities side-by-side and the only thing "odd" would be its use in casual conversation, unless you are prepared to receive a few strange looks.
 

Mehrgan

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Iran
Thanks for the reply. Then, regardless of their register, would the two sentences mean the same?

And, is there any informal adjective referring to a bunch of items which, when put together in a collection, would not make sense? (Say, a CD with tracks from classical, blues, and thrash metal?!)
 

Rover_KE

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Informal — a mishmash of styles.

Formal — an eclectic mix of styles.

Rover
 
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