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BobK

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What's the context? It's probably not right, but with a bit of effort I imagine I could think of a context in which it would work.

If you're saying that you hope someone does well in something, you could say '[Wishing you the - add this in writing] est of luck' or just 'Good luck'. There was a rather dated expression 'The best of British luck' - and people still use a short form of that - 'Best of British'. If they're a friend you might use the conventional wish used in the theatre: 'Break a leg'. (This wishing someone bad luck, meaning good, is a bit like the French covention (?) of saying "Merde" as a good-luck wish.)

If they're getting married, a traditional (joking) wish is 'May all your troubles be little ones' (which, accompanied by a wink, refers to one particular aspect of connubial bliss).

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BobK

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PS

Another context - nothing to do with good wishes - for the words 'with the best' is the idiom 'With the best will in the world...', which means 'Even if I wanted to, [so I'm not even going to try]': 'With the best will in the world, I couldn't get this done by the end of the day. Ask someone else.' But use 'will in the world' there, not 'hope'.

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