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hela

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Dear teachers,

1) One more question about sentence transformation instructions:

Instruction: It was silly of you to have done such a thing. (correct?)
Answer: If I … (were you I would not have done such a thing.)

2) What is the difference in meaning between:

a) She may not feel like doing it.
b) She cannot feel like doing it.

3) In a book I read that there are 2 meanings to “You shall come with me”, what are they?
Is it the same for the sentence “She shall belong to no other man”? Does it have 2 meanings too?

Thank you in advance for your help.
Best regards,
Héla
 

MikeNewYork

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hela said:
Dear teachers,

1) One more question about sentence transformation instructions:

Instruction: It was silly of you to have done such a thing. (correct?)
Answer: If I … (were you I would not have done such a thing.)

The answer is possible, but it really doesn't convey the same meaning. The answer loses the pejorative nature of "silly".

2) What is the difference in meaning between:

a) She may not feel like doing it.
b) She cannot feel like doing it.

In general, "may" is about possibility and "can" is about ability. In this case, sentence #2 is a bit odd. One who is alive and conscious can normally feel anyway they like about something.

3) In a book I read that there are 2 meanings to “You shall come with me”, what are they?
Is it the same for the sentence “She shall belong to no other man”? Does it have 2 meanings too?

Technically, shall can be used for future prediction or command. So this sentence could be prediction or command. In the second person, I would read it as "command" with no other context.

I would read your second as a strong prediction to a threat.
 
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luckychris

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hello mikeneyork,
does "feel like" mean be going to?
what like about something mean in the sentence "One who is alive and conscious can normally feel anyway they like about something."?
thak you!
 

MikeNewYork

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luckychris said:
hello mikeneyork,
does "feel like" mean be going to?
what like about something mean in the sentence "One who is alive and conscious can normally feel anyway they like about something."?
thak you!

"Feel like", in this context (feel like going to), means "want to" go, "is in the mood to" go.

It means that people who are alive and awake can have whatever feelings or wishes they want to have. :wink:
 

Tdol

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hela said:
3) In a book I read that there are 2 meanings to “You shall come with me”, what are they?
Is it the same for the sentence “She shall belong to no other man”? Does it have 2 meanings too?

Thank you in advance for your help.
Best regards,
Héla

'You shall come with me' would be used in British English to over-ride the other person's intentions. It's a strong order. 'She shall belong to no other man' is a worrying sentence; it could mean that the speaker would rather kill her than see her with another man.
;-0
 

MikeNewYork

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tdol said:
hela said:
3) In a book I read that there are 2 meanings to “You shall come with me”, what are they?
Is it the same for the sentence “She shall belong to no other man”? Does it have 2 meanings too?

Thank you in advance for your help.
Best regards,
Héla

'You shall come with me' would be used in British English to over-ride the other person's intentions. It's a strong order. 'She shall belong to no other man' is a worrying sentence; it could mean that the speaker would rather kill her than see her with another man.
;-0

You Brits are a violent lot. :lol:
 

Tdol

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MikeNewYork said:
You Brits are a violent lot. :lol:
:grab: :snipersm: :2gunfire: :lol:
 
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