Most cheerful/ makes me feel depressed

Rachel Adams

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Is it wrong to use "the" before "most cheerful" and when saying how you feel isn't "feel" optional in "makes me feel depressed/happy"?

"Rain makes me feel depressed. Sunny weather doesn't often come here in winter. I love sunny days. In this weather I am most cheerful."
 

emsr2d2

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Is it wrong to use "the" before "most cheerful" and, when saying how you feel, isn't "feel" optional in "makes me feel depressed/happy"?

"Rain makes me feel depressed. Sunny weather doesn't often come here in winter. I love sunny days. In this weather, I am most cheerful."
It's more natural to omit "feel" and just say that it makes you depressed.
It would be wrong to say "the most cheerful" at the end. You could say "my most cheerful".

"Sunny weather doesn't often come here" isn't natural. We don't refer to weather as "coming" (unless you're talking about the arrival of a storm or similar). Say "It's not often sunny here in winter".
 

Rachel Adams

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It's more natural to omit "feel" and just say that it makes you depressed.
It would be wrong to say "the most cheerful" at the end. You could say "my most cheerful".

"Sunny weather doesn't often come here" isn't natural. We don't refer to weather as "coming" (unless you're talking about the arrival of a storm or similar). Say "It's not often sunny here in winter".
Is this part natural "I love sunny days. In this weather I am most cheerful"?
 

emsr2d2

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Is this part natural "I love sunny days. In this weather, I am most cheerful"?

The first sentence is OK. The second isn't how I would say it but it's not grammatically incorrect. I'd say "I love sunny days - they make me really happy" or "I'm at my happiest when it's sunny".

Note my addition of a comma after "weather". I missed that in my first response (though I've added it now).
 
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Yankee

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Is it wrong to use "the" before "most cheerful" ? (No.)and when saying how you feel isn't "feel" optional in "makes me feel depressed/happy"? (Yes, but I would tend to use it.)

"Rain makes me feel depressed. Sunny weather doesn't occur often come here in winter. I love sunny days. In this weather I am most cheerful."
My shot.
 

Rachel Adams

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It's more natural to omit "feel" and just say that it makes you depressed.
It would be wrong to say "the most cheerful" at the end. You could say "my most cheerful".

"Sunny weather doesn't often come here" isn't natural. We don't refer to weather as "coming" (unless you're talking about the arrival of a storm or similar). Say "It's not often sunny here in winter".
Sorry, I didn't understand this part "you could say my most cheerful". Could you please explain once again?
 

emsr2d2

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In this weather, I am at my most cheerful.

This construction is fairly common.

Unemployment is at its highest for ten years.
She suffers with depression. Yesterday, she was at her lowest.
At its worst, the hail was the size of golf balls!
 
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