Much to the sadness of his students

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Bassim

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I am wondering if my sentence is grammatically correct.

Much to the sadness of his students, the old professor had to retire because of ill health.
 

Tarheel

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GoesStation

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It would be more natural to say Much to his students' distress.
 

Tarheel

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Doctor Sowell quit writing his weekly column, and it made me sad, not distressed.
 

Rover_KE

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I'm not a lover of 'Much to the sadness of his students...'

I might say 'Much to the disappointment ...'
 

emsr2d2

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Or "Much to the dismay of his students, ..."
 

Charlie Bernstein

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Use dismay if the students are alarmed, upset, or agitated. Use disappointment if they're simply sad.
 

Tdol

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You could use his students were saddened....
 
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