[Vocabulary] My brother is hooked on politics.

beachboy

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My brother is hooked on politics / soccer.
My brother is into politics / soccer.
My brother goes in for politics / soccer.

Do any of these 6 sentences sound strange? What's the difference between "to be hooked on something", "to be into something" and "to go in for something"?
 

Skrej

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'Hooked' implies a deeper sense of commitment or desire than 'into', to the point you're unable to stop. That's why we say 'hooked on drugs' - you can't voluntarily stop, although in this context it's not so quit so literal. 'Into' could just be a mild interest.


I find the 'goes in for' construction unnatural in this context. I've only heard it used in the context of 'move towards'. Maybe it's a regional difference.
 

emsr2d2

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We do use "go in for" in BrE but it doesn't quite work in your sentence. It means something closer to "participate in" or "enjoy".

- Are you taking part in the political demonstration on Saturday?
- No. I don't go in for things like that.
 
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