[Grammar] My glasses should be in the right drawer.

beachboy

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My glasses should be in the right drawer.

1) I always put them there, so there is a strong probability that they're there.
2) I've just opened the right drawer, and I'm surprised because I expected my glasses to be there, but they're not.

Are both contexts o.k.?
 

Barb_D

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If you've just opened the right drawer and they are not there, then "My glasses should be in this drawer."

If you found them in the left drawer, you might say the phrase as you've written it.
 

beachboy

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If you've just opened the right drawer and they are not there, then "My glasses should be in this drawer."

If you found them in the left drawer, you might say the phrase as you've written it.

What if my wife calls me asking where her glasses are, and I usually see (or place) them in a specific drawer, can I tell her "Dear, your glasses should be in the right drawer (meaning that I expect them to be there). Check it out"?
 

Barb_D

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Your description 1 was correct. I was writing about 2.

What you write about the meaning is correct. In real life, we'd probably say "Have you checked the right drawer?" or "Probably in the right drawer." (I assume both of us know which piece of furniture we are looking in.)
 

GoesStation

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What if my wife calls me asking where her glasses are, and I usually see (or place) them in a specific drawer, can I tell her "Dear, your glasses should be in the right drawer (meaning that I expect them to be there). Check it out"?
I'd say right-hand drawer. "The right drawer" is ambiguous; it can mean either "the drawer on the right" or "the correct drawer".
 

Lynxear

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My glasses should be in the right drawer.

1) I [STRIKE]always[/STRIKE] usually put them there, so there is a strong probability that they're there.
2) I've just opened the right drawer, and I'm surprised because I expected my glasses to be there, but they're not.

Are both contexts o.k.?

I would change sentence #2,

I've just opened the right drawer, and to my surprise they are not there.
 
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