neither...nor

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blacknomi

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I found a sentence in my dictionary that goes this way,

A pagan is a person who is not a believer in any of the world's chief religions, esp one who is neither a Christian, a Jew nor a Moslem.

The structure of "neither...nor" is often times used to join two negative ideas. I think it can connect more than two ideas, right? Can I apply this to the structure of 'either...or'?
 

Casiopea

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blacknomi said:
I found a sentence in my dictionary that goes this way,

A pagan is a person who is not a believer in any of the world's chief religions, esp one who is neither a Christian, a Jew nor a Moslem.

The structure of "neither...nor" is often times used to join two negative ideas. I think it can connect more than two ideas, right? Can I apply this to the structure of 'either...or'?

According to the American Heritage Book of English Usage, the traditional rule holds that neither...nor means “not one or the other of two.”

If there are three or more, use none instead of neither..nor and any instead of either...or.

All the best, :D
 

Mister Micawber

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Or, in this case, it should strictly read 'A pagan is a person who is not a believer in any of the world's chief religions, esp one who is not a Christian, a Jew, or a Moslem.'
 

blacknomi

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Casiopea said:
According to the American Heritage Book of English Usage, the traditional rule holds that neither...nor means “not one or the other of two.”

If there are three or more, use none instead of neither..nor and any instead of either...or.


Cas,
That's exactly what I think. If I want to negate 3 or more things, I will use none.

What about?
1.A pagan is a person who is not a believer in any of the world's chief religions, esp one who is not a Christian, a Jew or a Moslem.
2. Pagan are those who are not believers in any of the world's chief religions, esp none of them is a Christian, a Jew or a Moslem.


This is what Michael Swan said in his grammar book.
Sometimes more than two ideas are connected by neither...nor.

Example,
He neither smiles, spoke, nor looked at me.
Does this occur often? :?
I would simply say he didn't smile, speak and even didn't look at me AT ALL. (Am I that ugly?) :D

What do you think?



Blacknomi
 

Casiopea

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blacknomi said:
What about?
1. A pagan is a person who is not a believer in any of the world's chief religions, esp one who is not a Christian, a Jew or a Moslem.

2. Pagan are those who are not believers in any of the world's chief religions, esp none of them is a Christian, a Jew or a Moslem.

As MM as noted, 'one who is not....'. (OK) one who is none is odd. The adverb not negates 'is'. :wink:

blacknomi said:
This is what Michael Swan said in his grammar book.
Sometimes more than two ideas are connected by neither...nor.

Example
He neither smiled, spoke, nor looked at me.
Does this occur often? :?
I would simply say he didn't smile, speak and even didn't look at me AT ALL. (Am I that ugly?) :D[/quote]

Swan cites a rare usage, but a 'usage' nonetheless (i.e., He did neither of these things, wherein 'things' can refer to more than one idea. :wink:

Linguists today, of which Michael Swan is one, look at the function and distribution of language. The forms they cite need not be "grammatical" in the traditional sense. If a given majority of speakers use the form, then the form is listed, as acceptable.

All the best, :D
 

blacknomi

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Mister Micawber said:
Or, in this case, it should strictly read 'A pagan is a person who is not a believer in any of the world's chief religions, esp one who is not a Christian, a Jew, or a Moslem.'

:hi: Mr. M,
Welcome to this forum. And thanks, I understand now. :wink:


Pastel from there. What a small world we have. 8) :lol: :shock:
 

blacknomi

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Casiopea said:
Linguists today, of which Michael Swan is one, look at the function and distribution of language. The forms they cite need not be "grammatical" in the traditional sense. If a given majority of speakers use the form, then the form is listed, as acceptable.
:D

Cas, I understand what you mean. Thank you. :D
 

blacknomi

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I'm sorry to hear that. THAT was supposed to hit us. But somehow he changed his mind?! Is THAT a he or she this time? :shock:


Take care, Cas. < A bIG BIG hug>
 

Tdol

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Casiopea said:
You're welcome. :D

We've a typhoon tonight! :shock:

I hope it maitains a polite distance. :shock:
 

Casiopea

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blacknomi said:
I'm sorry to hear that. THAT was supposed to hit us. But somehow he changed his mind?! Is THAT a he or she this time? :shock:

Take care, Cas. < A bIG BIG hug>

Thank you. :D :D The winds took the typhoon in another direction--so we were safe--but there was a lot of rain!

In North America, typhoons, which some people refer to as hurricanes, are named after females and males, but that wasn't always the case. They used to be named after females only, but the sexual revolution came along and male names were added for the sake of equality.

In Japan, typhoons are numbers. Last night's typhoon was labelled 21.

All the best, :D
 

blacknomi

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Casiopea said:
In Japan, typhoons are numbers. Last night's typhoon was labelled 21.


They are numbers?! Okay, but then was that the 21st typhoon so far this year? That was way to many. How does your Weather Bureau give each typhoon its number? If the typhoon hits Japan, then he has a cool number. Is that so?


One Englsih question:
Last night's typhoon ==> Yesterday evening's typhoon. :?:
Last night's moon :?:
Last night's weather :?:

Are they correct to say and write? :shock:
 

Tdol

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A cool number? That would be if they called them things like 007. ;-)
 

Casiopea

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blacknomi said:
One English question:
Last night's typhoon ==> Yesterday evening's typhoon. :?:
Last night's moon :?:
Last night's weather :?:

Are they correct to say and write? :shock:

Maybe it's Casiopea-speak. :lol:

It's a variation on structure, or rather the lack of structure:

The typhoon (we had) last night.
The typhoon last night
Last night's typhoon

Same holds true for these:
The moon (we had) last night.
The weather ( we had) last night.

Psst. I don't know how or even why the section of the weather bureau that oversees typhoons numbers them. Sorry. :oops:

All the best, :D
 

alexandre42

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Casiopea said:
blacknomi said:
I'm sorry to hear that. THAT was supposed to hit us. But somehow he changed his mind?! Is THAT a he or she this time? :shock:

Take care, Cas. < A bIG BIG hug>

Thank you. :D :D The winds took the typhoon in another direction--so we were safe--but there was a lot of rain!

In North America, typhoons, which some people refer to as hurricanes, are named after females and males, but that wasn't always the case. They used to be named after females only, but the sexual revolution came along and male names were added for the sake of equality.

In Japan, typhoons are numbers. Last night's typhoon was labelled 21.

All the best, :D

Since the females take power there are more 'her' typhons . I hope this one has moved in other way you.
 
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