Neither with another negative

Ju

Key Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Hong Kong
Current Location
Hong Kong
I've found the following information from Cambridge dictionary.

The use of neither with another negative, as in:

1. I don’t like him neither.

2. He’s not much good at reading neither.


I'm confused as I thought 1) should be written as
"I don't like him either."

Please help.

Thanks.
 

Charlie Bernstein

VIP Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2009
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I've found the following information from Cambridge dictionary.

The use of neither with another negative, as in:

1. I don’t like him neither.

2. He’s not much good at reading neither.


I'm confused as I thought 1) should be written as
"I don't like him either."

Please help.

Thanks.

I'm with you. Cambridge is dead wrong on both of those.

Of course, I'm a Yankee. Let's see what the Brits say.
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
You should have read further.

The use of neither with another negative, as in:

I don’t like him neither.

He’s not much good at reading neither.

is recorded from the 16th century onwards, but is not considered Standard English. This is because it is an example of a double negative, which, though standard in some other languages such as Spanish and found in many dialects of English, is not acceptable in standard English. In the sentences above, either should be used instead. For more information, see double negatives.
 
Top