New question..........

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eric2004

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What means "co-dependent" and "self-destructive"? I didn't find them out in dictionary. But one guy in Friends used them. :cry:
 

Tdol

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Self-destructive means doing things that might cause physical, economic or other harm to oneself.
Here's Merriam Webster's entry for co-dependent:
Main Entry: co·de·pen·den·cy
Pronunciation: -d&n(t)-sE
Function: noun
: a psychological condition or a relationship in which a person is controlled or manipulated by another who is affected with a pathological condition (as an addiction to alcohol or heroin)
- co·de·pen·dent /-d&nt/ noun or adjective

:lol:
 
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eric2004

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Thanks. Tdol.
I have to ask a new question.

What's it supposed to mean by "bust my ass"?
I'm busy in....? Am I right?
 
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eric2004

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another question

He made a move on her.
it means He flirted with her? or bully her?
sexual disturbance?
 
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eric2004

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Again.


.And I always figured, when the right one comes along, I'd be able to be a stand-up guy and go the distance...

What means " a stand-up guy" and "go the distance"?
 

Tdol

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Go the distance = go all the way.
 
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eric2004

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How about this question.

I was panicked or I was panicky ?

Which one should be the right usage or both them can work out?
 

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eric2004 said:
Thanks. Tdol.
I have to ask a new question.

What's it supposed to mean by "bust my ass"?
I'm busy in....? Am I right?

A little context would be helpful there. Perhaps it means something like scold, but I can't be sure.

:)
 

RonBee

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eric2004 said:
another question

He made a move on her.
it means He flirted with her? or bully her?
sexual disturbance?

"He made a move on her" means he overtly indicated his sexual interest in her.

:)
 

RonBee

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eric2004 said:
Again.


.And I always figured, when the right one comes along, I'd be able to be a stand-up guy and go the distance...

What means " a stand-up guy" and "go the distance"?

A "standup guy" is somebody who can be counted on. He is forthright and honest. He does what he says he is going to do.

:)
 

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eric2004 said:
How about this question.

I was panicked or I was panicky ?

Which one should be the right usage or both them can work out?

The person's state of mind is possibly the same, but one is a verb ("panicked") and the other is an adjective ("panicky'). "I was panicked" indicates what the person did. "I was panicky" indicates the person's state of mind. Do you have a context for that?

:)
 
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eric2004

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:D Thanks a zillion, dear Ron. :!:
Hmm, all of questions here are from lines in Friends.
Next time I'll put more context for you when I get new problems.
 
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eric2004

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New question.

"you'd be starin' at the business end of a hissy fit. "

I was completely stuck in understanding this sentence. Please give me a hand, dear teachers.
 
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eric2004

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"It's like the pot calling the kettle black"


same as " It takes one to know one"?????
 

Tdol

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It's a bit similar, but we use the 'pot caling the kettle black' when someone accuses a person of something, though they are guilty of worse. You'd say it when a notoriously dishonest politican, say, accused a colleague of lying. ;-)
 

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eric2004 said:
New question.

"you'd be starin' at the business end of a hissy fit. "

I was completely stuck in understanding this sentence. Please give me a hand, dear teachers.

The phrase "business end" is used in a few phrases. It always indicates the part if something that gives a person trouble. For example, the "business end" of a baseball bat can hurt you.

:)
 

RonBee

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eric2004 said:
:D Thanks a zillion, dear Ron. :!:
Hmm, all of questions here are from lines in Friends.
Next time I'll put more context for you when I get new problems.

Context is always important. The reason I asked you that question is that I can always explain the meaning of a sentence better if I understand its context.

:)
 
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eric2004

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"You two are totally into each other"

One girl said it to another gilr when this another girl had met a fansinating guy a while before.

What does it exactly mean?
 

Tdol

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They are fascinated and involved with one another.
 
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eric2004

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Thanks, new one.

"If you need something to hold you over, I'll get you a job right here."

What means "hold you over'?
 
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