New York City, but the village of Dovzhky

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Marmu

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Is it true that we write New York City, but the village of Dovzhky? I mean, that we use “city” after its name, but “village/town” before with preposition “of”? I was told so, but I cannot find any explanation.

Thank you very much for your help!
 

5jj

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We can say either 'New York City' or 'the City of New York.

We would never say 'London City'; Durham is the only British city I can think of where that form is common, but then Durham City is weird - it is situated in County Durham. While the order 'County X' is common in Ireland, it is not in England.


ps. According to Roger Whittaker, it's Durham Town.
 
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riquecohen

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We say New York City to distinguish it from New York State. If it is clear that the city is being referred to, just New York would serve. There are, however, several US cities that have 'city' as part of their name, e.g. Johnson City, Kansas City, Atlantic City, Iowa City, Sioux City, etc.
 
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