no thanks to

jasonlulu_2000

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2012
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
China
Current Location
China
Source:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JqyhgQYEGpY

At 0:15, I hear "The Japanese man has had his entry ticket in hand since March but no thanks to the global health crisis he's also been stranded in a town close to the ruins since then." Is it right?

What does "no thanks to" mean here?

Thanks!

Jason
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
My guess is that the script said "but now, thanks to the global health crisis …." The narrator's accent, or a careless slip, makes "now" sound like "no".
 

PeterCW

Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2020
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
As a native BrE speaker I would have said "... but thanks to ...". What she means is "... as result of ...".

"Thanks to" is a common expression in colloquial English and is used for both positive and negative results.
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
In that context, "thanks to" is the obvious choice. I agree that it's likely to have been "... now, thanks to ...".

We do use "no thanks to" though, in a different context.

Imagine that Sarah is trying to do her homework but her younger brother, Steve, keeps interrupting her, distracting her, trying to get her to do something else. A little later, their mum asks Sarah, "Did you manage to get your homework done?" Sarah replies, "I did - no thanks to Steve!"

In that context, it effectively means "I did, despite Steve constantly behaving in a way that was not at all helpful!"
 

jutfrank

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2014
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
My guess is that the script said "but now, thanks to the global health crisis …." The narrator's accent, or a careless slip, makes "now" sound like "no".

I think that's quite likely, yes, but I wouldn't rule out the possibility that this was just a misuse of no thanks to, in an attempt by the writer to make it clear that he/she attributes the cause (the global health crisis) as a hindrance.
 
Top