"not appropraite" VS "unappropraite"

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notatall

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It is not appropraite to compare copyright issues with personal property issues
Could any one tell me if I can replace "not appropraite" with "inappropraite" in above sentence? and let me know why grammatically?
 
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banderas

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It is not appropraite to compare copyright issues with personal property issues
Could any one tell me if I can replace "not appropraite" with "unappropraite" in above sentence? and let me know why grammatically?
Anglika is dead right.
I am not sure if "ununappropriate" exists in common use. Probably only as a verb:
to take from private possession; to restore to the possession or right of all; as, to unappropriate a monopoly.
UNAPPROPRIATE
 

notatall

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Anglika is dead right.
I am not sure if "ununappropriate" exists in common use. Probably only as a verb:
to take from private possession; to restore to the possession or right of all; as, to unappropriate a monopoly.
UNAPPROPRIATE
Sorry for the typo. it should be "inappropraite"

Could you tell me if I can replace "not appropraite" with "inappropraite" in above sentence? and let me know why grammatically?
 

banderas

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Sorry for the typo. it should be "inappropraite"

Could you tell me if I can replace "not appropraite" with "inappropraite" in above sentence? and let me know why grammatically?

Yes, you can. I can see no difference, to be honest.
 

naomimalan

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Yes, you can. I can see no difference, to be honest.

With the adjective appropriate Banderas:-D, I think there might be an ever so slight distinction in terms of 'politeness'. Maybe with not, you're being considerate towards the other person, not wanting to hurt their feelings.

Certainly with other adjectives, there can indeed be a difference e.g with possible. I remember suggesting (in a fax)a day for an agreed lunch date to a non-native English teacher. He faxed me back with the word "impossible".

I was offended. If he had written "not possible", I wouldn't have been. :-D:-D
 

banderas

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With the adjective appropriate Banderas:-D, I think there might be an ever so slight distinction in terms of 'politeness'. Maybe with not, you're being considerate towards the other person, not wanting to hurt their feelings.

Certainly with other adjectives, there can indeed be a difference e.g with possible. I remember suggesting (in a fax)a day for an agreed lunch date to a non-native English teacher. He faxed me back with the word "impossible".

I was offended. If he had written "not possible", I wouldn't have been. :-D:-D
Hi Naomimalan,
thanks for this suggestion!
I thought that "inappriopriate" might be a stronger expression than "not appriopriate" and even checked BNC. I eventually came to think it does not have to be the case. I believe that native speaker's opinion is more valuable for me than hits from the mentioned source. Thank you again. ;-)
 

notatall

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Hi Naomimalan,
thanks for this suggestion!
I thought that "inappriopriate" might be a stronger expression than "not appriopriate" and even checked BNC. I eventually came to think it does not have to be the case. I believe that native speaker's opinion is more valuable for me than hits from the mentioned source. Thank you again. ;-)
Thank you both.
I think I can apply the method to many adjective having in- or un-form
 

naomimalan

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Hi Naomimalan,
thanks for this suggestion!
I thought that "inappriopriate" might be a stronger expression than "not appriopriate" and even checked BNC. I eventually came to think it does not have to be the case. I believe that native speaker's opinion is more valuable for me than hits from the mentioned source. Thank you again. ;-)

Thanks for the nice compliment Banderas! :-D:-D
 

BobK

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if there is any difference between them, then what is that?
Thank you

The way I hear it, the phrase 'inappropriate behaviour' is often used in a social and/or sexual context. Behaviour that is just not appropriate can occur in a wider range of contexts.

For a waste collector (we called them 'dustmen' in those days) to ask for a tip at Christmas time (as they used to, in the UK, until the late 1950s) would now be regarded as behaviour that is not appropriate. For a waste collector to whistle when a woman passes by is inappropriate behaviour.

b
 

notatall

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The way I hear it, the phrase 'inappropriate behaviour' is often used in a social and/or sexual context. Behaviour that is just not appropriate can occur in a wider range of contexts.

For a waste collector (we called them 'dustmen' in those days) to ask for a tip at Christmas time (as they used to, in the UK, until the late 1950s) would now be regarded as behaviour that is not appropriate. For a waste collector to whistle when a woman passes by is inappropriate behaviour.

b
yes, good example. I am more clear about the difference.
thank you
 
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