Noun

UmaAshokan

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Is the feminine word for tailor?
 

5jj

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Welcome to the forum, UmaAshokan.

We don't use feminine versions these days. Both men and women are tailors.
 

Nabih

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Is there a concept of feminine and masculine word in English? I guess it's only in French language (or perhaps) in some other languages.
 

TheParser

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***** NOT A TEACHER *****


Hello, Nabih:

Here in the United States, people now use gender-neutral nouns. (It is considered discourteous to use gender-specific nouns.)

Here are a few examples:

waiter / waitress. NOW: server.
actor / actress. NOW: actor.
mailman. NOW: letter carrier.
steward / stewardess. NOW: flight attendant.
fireman. NOW: firefighter.
poet / poetess. NOW: poet.
host / hostess. NOW: host.

NOTES:

1. Many (most?) women -- in my opinion -- would NOT feel insulted if you referred to them as a "waitress," "actress," or "hostess," but I am 99% sure that they WOULD be very upset (unhappy) if you referred to them as a "stewardess" or "poetess."

2. Many nouns in English are already gender-neutral. E.g., [for example] president, teacher, plumber, clerk [sales associate], soldier, etc.





James
 
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