nouns in apposition

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Anonymous

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My sixthe grade are having a difficult time with this concept. Can you give me an easy way to explain appositives in the nominative case and appositives in the objective case?
 

Tdol

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I use apposition to refer to a phrase where two nouns or nounphrases are either the same or similar: Einstein, the physicist,

I see no difference between the cases except in terms of position:

Einstein, the physicist, said that ...... (nominative)
She interviewed Einstein, the physicist, (objective)

Commas are generally used, but are also omitted in examples like the following:
apposition

n : a grammatical relation between a word and a noun phrase that follows; "`Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer' is an example of apposition"


Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University
 
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Anonymous

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tdol said:
I use apposition to refer to a phrase where two nouns or nounphrases are either the same or similar: Einstein, the physicist,

I see no difference between the cases except in terms of position:

Einstein, the physicist, said that ...... (nominative)
She interviewed Einstein, the physicist, (objective)

Commas are generally used, but are also omitted in examples like the following:
apposition

n : a grammatical relation between a word and a noun phrase that follows; "`Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer' is an example of apposition"


Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University


Interesting. Though I was aware of apposition, I was not aware of how to contrast the different types of apposition by definition.

:D :shock: 8)
 

Vincentio

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Vis-à-vis the "Einstein, the physicist" and "Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer" examples, don't forget that there's a restrictive vs. nonrestrictive element to be considered when using a comma before the appositive. The classic example: "My wife, Margaret, said..." (I have only, one wife, so the name merely adds information, meaning the comma is required) versus "my sister Margaret said..." (I have two sisters and the one talking was Margaret, so the name qualifies the noun and the comma is dropped).


I use apposition to refer to a phrase where two nouns or nounphrases are either the same or similar: Einstein, the physicist,

I see no difference between the cases except in terms of position:

Einstein, the physicist, said that ...... (nominative)
She interviewed Einstein, the physicist, (objective)

Commas are generally used, but are also omitted in examples like the following:
apposition

n : a grammatical relation between a word and a noun phrase that follows; "`Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer' is an example of apposition"


Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University
 
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