Nurture

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Flores

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I have always wanted to understand the meaning and the use os this word. I'm learning English and my teacher doesn't know this word. Would you mind explaining me a little about it?
 

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foster: help develop, help grow; "nurture his talents"
rear: bring up; "raise a family"; "bring up children"
raising: the properties acquired as a consequence of the way you were treated as a child
breeding: helping someone grow up to be an accepted member of the community; "they debated whether nature or nurture was more important"
nourish: provide with nourishment; "We sustained ourselves on bread and water"; "This kind of food is not nourishing for young children"

hope this helps
 

banderas

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I have always wanted to understand the meaning and the use os this word. I'm learning English and my teacher doesn't know this word. Would you mind explaining me a little about it?
nurture=personal experiences

do you want me to expand on it?
 

stuartnz

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nurture=personal experiences

do you want me to expand on it?


I would, as I've never heard or read "nurture" being used to mean "personal experiences". I'm familiar with the uses marciobarbalho lists, but not with this one. In NZ English , "nurture" basically means either "care" or raising or upbringing as a verb. The only use of "nurture" as a noun in NZ English would be in the phrase "nurture or nature".

I could talk about my upbringing, but I could not talk about my nurture. I could say, "my Dad was a very nurturing parent", and "my Dad gave me a good upbringing", but I could not say "my Mum did not give her children nurture" or, "because she left when I was only three, I don't remember any nurture from my mother". I could say, "I am too lazy to nurture my plants", but I could not say " I gave my plants bad nurture." So I would be very interested to learn of this "personal experiences" definition, since it is completely new to me.
 

banderas

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I would, as I've never heard or read "nurture" being used to mean "personal experiences". I'm familiar with the uses marciobarbalho lists, but not with this one. In NZ English , "nurture" basically means either "care" or raising or upbringing as a verb. The only use of "nurture" as a noun in NZ English would be in the phrase "nurture or nature".

I could talk about my upbringing, but I could not talk about my nurture. I could say, "my Dad was a very nurturing parent", and "my Dad gave me a good upbringing", but I could not say "my Mum did not give her children nurture" or, "because she left when I was only three, I don't remember any nurture from my mother". I could say, "I am too lazy to nurture my plants", but I could not say " I gave my plants bad nurture." So I would be very interested to learn of this "personal experiences" definition, since it is completely new to me.

Sure, I see this term as the way in which children are treated as they are growing, especially as compared with the characteristics they are born with:
"Which do you believe has the strongest influence on how children develop - nature or nurture" (personal experiences)? What I meant is that the way we are treated result in personal experiences and what are we as adults.
 

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Sure, I see this term as the way in which children are treated as they are growing, especially as compared with the characteristics they are born with:
"Which do you believe has the strongest influence on how children develop - nature or nurture" (personal experiences)? What I meant is that the way we are treated result in personal experiences and what are we as adults.


Ah, well there I would have to disagree, because "personal experiences" includes much, much more than the nurturing, or lack thereof, provided by those responsible for one's upbringing. My "personal experiences" include all the things that happened to me at school, with my friends, and in many other situations that had absolutely no connection with the "nurturing" (never "the nurture") that I got from my father and grandparents. So, I would say that to equate "nurture" with "personal experiences" is to expand its meaning in a way that would not be understood by many native English speakers.
 

banderas

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Ah, well there I would have to disagree, because "personal experiences" includes much, much more than the nurturing, or lack thereof, provided by those responsible for one's upbringing. My "personal experiences" include all the things that happened to me at school, with my friends, and in many other situations that had absolutely no connection with the "nurturing" (never "the nurture") that I got from my father and grandparents. So, I would say that to equate "nurture" with "personal experiences" is to expand its meaning in a way that would not be understood by many native English speakers.

This is that I like about English.
One term can have more then one meaning. Nurture =educate, if you restrict the process of education to the age between 1-18, then I can see your point easily. However, for many people the process of education never ends and even the various interaction with people in our routine life might be still seen as an education.

If you have an impression that I expand the meaning of nurturing, then this is what you enjoy about English, don't you, stuart?
 

stuartnz

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This is that I like about English.
One term can have more then one meaning. Nurture =educate, if you restrict the process of education to the age between 1-18, then I can see your point easily. However, for many people the process of education never ends and even the various interaction with people in our routine life might be still seen as an education.

If you have an impression that I expand the meaning of nurturing, then this is what you enjoy about English, don't you, stuart?

Absolutely. I have no problem with meanings expanding and changing, in fact I celebrate it. Nevertheless, I would advise caution when offering very terse definitions such "nurture= personal experiences". Especially when such definitions are given to learners, they can cause difficulties for them.

For a particular, narrowly specific use of "nurture", "personal experiences" form part of the definition, but to say simply, "nurture = personal experiences" is analogous to saying "food = apples". If the goal is mutual comprehension, the bald definition "nurture = personal experiences" would not only be significantly less helpful than the defintions provided by marciobarbalho, it would quite possibly be counterproductive.As a test, I'd suggest asking random native speakers on the street how they would define "nurture". I would wager that very few, if any at all, would reply "nurture = personal experiences". I'd wager much more that even fewer of them would reply "nurture = education".
 

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For a particular, narrowly specific use of "nurture", "personal experiences" form part of the definition, but to say simply, "nurture = personal experiences" is analogous to saying "food = apples". I completely agree with you here, This is way Marciobarballo talked about food being soemthing people eat to keep themselves alive and after that I added that food=apple to extend on this subject;-)


.As a test, I'd suggest asking random native speakers on the street how they would define "nurture". I would wager that very few, if any at all, would reply "nurture = personal experiences". I'd wager much more that even fewer of them would reply "nurture = education".
I believe so but I feel tempted to make this test on the forum although many might have read our talk. What do you think? shall we?
By the way, discussions with you are always beneficial, thanks:)

Ps. have a loot at this if you like.
Focus on One Concept Until Success Blog Archive Nature versus Nurture
 

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Attention: I'm not a techer.

Hi Flores,

There are some more synonyms of both verb and noun “nurture” as well as further examples from British National Corpus:

nurture (v) = bring up, care for, cultivate, develop, discipline, educate, feed, instruct, nourish, nurse, protect, rear, school, support, sustain, tend, train.

nurture (n) = care, cultivation, development, discipline, education, food, nourishment, rearing, training, upbringing.

Although "nurture" has historically been referred to as the care given to children by the parents, with the mother playing a role of particular importance, this term is now regarded by some as any environmental (not genetic) factor in the contemporary nature versus nurture debate. Thus the definition of "nurture" has been expanded in order to include the influences on development arising from prenatal, parental, extended family and peer experiences, extending to influences such as media, marketing and socio-economic status. Indeed, a substantial source of environmental input to human nature may arise from stochastic variations in prenataldevelopment.

Timotei Moisturiser is able to nurture the softness of your skin by working in perfect harmony with it.
The party's myopic concentration on the kind of agricultural organizations it wished to nurture for the future is also shown in the frequent reports for 1922 on the fragile..
There is a disputed question about the proportions of nature (psychology) to nurture (sociology), but, to keep X on the border between top and..
This becomes clear especially to those who disagree with the content of the nurture .
Philosophy, as a discipline, helps to develop and nurture students' analytical abilities and broaden their intellectual horizons
Narture of the mind.
Nurture is stronger than nature.
There are some more delicately nurtured girls.
A delicate plant, the Pinot Noir is difficult to nurture through the freezing cold winters of Champagne.
Encouragement and real results are the essential ingredients required to nurture adequate supplies of willpower and to keep it growing.
Supermarkets seldom have time to nurture the cheese to full maturity and it is often sold with a large, hard…
Social learning theory refers to the nurture side of the nature-nurture debate.
It is the positive nurture of man's relationship with God, the creative cultivation of charismata;
The Solheim Cup should help to nurture interest among prospective sponsors, while there are players;
A lot of time is taken to nurture contact between senior girls and the junior school.
Nursery beds at the centre are to be used by school groups to nurture the seeds of the trees.
It is up to politicians in a democracy to nurture faith in it, not devalue that faith.
A wife's role is to nurture this Izzat and bring up her children so that they too understand and respect it.
This is why it is important to reject tired old debates about nature versus nurture .

Regards.

V.
 

stuartnz

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This is that I like about English.
One term can have more then one meaning.


This is exactly the reason why I reacted as I did to your earlier post. In response to a learner's question you said "nurture = personal experience". Yet I nurture my plants (occasionally), and I nurture my cat. In your subsequent reply you said "nurture = educate", which meaning makes even less sense if applied to my plants or my cat. If, as you say, you like the fact that English words can have more than one meaning, why post a terse, one meaning option as a definition?
 

banderas

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This is exactly the reason why I reacted as I did to your earlier post. In response to a learner's question you said "nurture = personal experience". Yet I nurture my plants (occasionally), and I nurture my cat. In your subsequent reply you said "nurture = educate", which meaning makes even less sense if applied to my plants or my cat. If, as you say, you like the fact that English words can have more than one meaning, why post a terse, one meaning option as a definition?

to expand on something someone else said before me, see:foster: help develop, help grow; "nurture his talents"
rear: bring up; "raise a family"; "bring up children"
raising: the properties acquired as a consequence of the way you were treated as a child
breeding: helping someone grow up to be an accepted member of the community; "they debated whether nature or nurture was more important"
nourish: provide with nourishment; "We sustained ourselves on bread and water"; "This kind of food is not nourishing for young children"
see?
 

stuartnz

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to expand on something someone else said before me, see:foster: help develop, help grow; "nurture his talents"
rear: bring up; "raise a family"; "bring up children"
raising: the properties acquired as a consequence of the way you were treated as a child
breeding: helping someone grow up to be an accepted member of the community; "they debated whether nature or nurture was more important"
nourish: provide with nourishment; "We sustained ourselves on bread and water"; "This kind of food is not nourishing for young children"
see?
No, I'm sorry, but I don't. The answer quoted above is detailed, providing options and examples of those options. I just can't grasp how saying "nurture = personal experience" expands on the above. To me, it's a contraction, a restriction, a narrowing, and if taken at face value could very easily be understood as saying that it is the only definition. As I read it, it would be comparable to someone asking, "what does 'free' mean?", and my offering in answer, "free = without cost." Such an answer would seem to me to be saying, "this word has only one meaning, and here it is."

However, it's obviously a difference in approach, and since I'm the one who can't understand how a terse one-word definition is an expansion of a detailed, multi-option definition, I'm happy to accept that the problem is located between my keyboard and chair, and leave it at that. :oops:
 
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