[Grammar] of larger face and differing more or less in form

kadioguy

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capital (adj.)

A capital letter "upper-case latter," of larger face and differing more or less in form (late 14c.) is so called because it stands at the "head" of a sentence or word.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/capital
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1. I think there should be a comma before 'is'. In other words:

A capital letter "upper-case latter," of larger face and differing more or less in form (late 14c.), is so called because it stands at the "head" of a sentence or word.

Am I right?

2. Does it mean '..., which is
of larger face and differing more or less in form (late 14c.)...?
 

emsr2d2

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capital (adj.)

A capital letter "upper-case latter," of larger face and differing more or less in form (late 14c.) is so called because it stands at the "head" of a sentence or word.


A capital letter "upper-case latter," of larger face and differing more or less in form (late 14c.), is so called because it stands at the "head" of a sentence or word.

Did they really misspell "letter" in the original?
 

emsr2d2

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In that case, I wouldn't set much store by anything else they write!
 

kadioguy

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In that case, I wouldn't set much store by anything else they write!

I am sorry for that, but maybe we can make that original explanation better!
So I would think if there is a comma before 'is' (and the misspelling gets corrected), it will be better. What do you think? :)
 
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emsr2d2

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You're right that there should be a comma before "is".
 
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