[Grammar] of which

Maybo

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Shakespeare's penning of these words has had consequences that he cannot have foreseen. It has resulted in countless theatrical performances, many of them in languages that he cannot have known and in countries of which he can have had no inkling.

What does "which" refer to? Theatrical performances?

I find I have difficulty in understanding "of which", "in which", "on which" etc. When should I use these kind of phrases?

Source: The History of King Lear: The Oxford Shakespeare
https://books.google.com.hk/books?i...equences that he cannot have foreseen&f=false
 

Matthew Wai

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He can have had no inkling of the countries in which the performances have taken place.
 

Maybo

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He can have had no inkling of the countries in which the performances have taken place.
in countries of which he can have had no inkling "Which" refers to "the countries"?
 

Matthew Wai

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I think the following also applies to 'of which', about which the OP is asking.

When it comes to determining the word with which the phrase with which is associated, proximity is your first test.
 

Roman55

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I find I have difficulty in understanding "of which", "in which", "on which" etc. When should I use these kind of phrases?

...and in countries of which he can have had no inkling, has the same meaning as, ...and in countries he can have had no inkling of. This is perfectly correct, but can sound overly formal or result in unnatural sounding sentences when the user is motivated by the avoidance of a preposition at the end of the sentence.
 
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