off and through

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Francois

Senior Member
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Jun 15, 2004
To carry off/pull off: what's the difference?
I think it's somewhat the same meaning as 'to carry out', but with the emphasis on the difficulty in succeeding. Is that correct?

To carry through/go through: what's the difference?
Eg.
"I didn't think he would have gone through with his threat"
"The board carried through their upheaval as planned"
Are the verbs interchangeable?

Thanks!

FRC
 

izabela

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2004
Hi,


Carry off: to handle successfully
Pull off: to perform in spite of difficulties or obstacles;
Carry out: to bring to a conclusion; accomplish

Go through: to examine carefully, to experience
Carry through: to accomplish, to complete successfully

They are all slightly different. Can you see the difference?

Iza


Francois said:
To carry off/pull off: what's the difference?
I think it's somewhat the same meaning as 'to carry out', but with the emphasis on the difficulty in succeeding. Is that correct?

To carry through/go through: what's the difference?
Eg.
"I didn't think he would have gone through with his threat"
"The board carried through their upheaval as planned"
Are the verbs interchangeable?

Thanks!

FRC
 

Francois

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
Well, more or less.
So 'to carry off' doesn't imply some difficulty?
What's the exact difference with 'to carry out' then? The former underlines the fact that you succeeded, whereas the latter put the emphasis on the fact that it was done as planned/expected/required?

As for 'to go through', is my example "I didn't think he would have gone through with his threat" wrong? Again, it comes from Cambridge dict.

FRC
 

izabela

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2004
Hi,

So 'to carry off' doesn't imply some difficulty?
What's the exact difference with 'to carry out' then? The former underlines the fact that you succeeded, whereas the latter put the emphasis on the fact that it was done as planned/expected/required?


Yes, that is right. Although, 'carry off' may be used when sth was difficult to do.


As for 'to go through', is my example "I didn't think he would have gone through with his threat" wrong?

I see your confusion now. This sentence is correct, but it has a different meaning because of the word 'with'. 'To go through with sth' means 'to do sth unpleasant or difficult'. What your sentence means is he actually let know about his threat.

Iza




FRC[/quote]
 
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