on getting out of the car

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teechar

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Yes, that's what it means.
However, I'm more likely to omit it in that sentence.

He broke his leg, getting out of the car.
 

emsr2d2

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I'd omit "on" too but I wouldn't use a comma. The implied word, for me, between "leg" and "getting" would be "while" or, if somehow getting out of the car were the cause of the break, "by".
 

teechar

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I think the comma is needed.

We have a participial phrase at the end of a sentence, and that phrase is modifying a word (he) which it (the phrase) does not directly follow.
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/627/02/

Here's another source which states that a non-restrictive participial phrase should be set off with a comma.
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/commas-with-participial-phrases

Moreover, consider the following example in which I used that same sentence but changed "broke" to "saw" and "his leg" to "Sam" just to demonstrate a point.

The sentence then becomes:

He saw Sam getting out of the car. [Here, it's Sam who is getting out of the car.]
He saw Sam, getting out of the car. [Here, it's "he" who is getting out of the car.]
 
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