one does not ask a question to a master who....

Status
Not open for further replies.

nelson13

Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2012
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Zhuang
Home Country
Bangladesh
Current Location
Japan
Judaism in Practice: From the Middle Ages Through the Early Modern Period - Google

There is a sentence: one does not ask a question to a master who....

The OALD says: You cannot say ‘ask to somebody’:[STRIKE] I asked to my friend what had happened.[/STRIKE]

I think the two sentences are the same in structure; the example sentence considered wrong given by the OALD can be written as I asked what had happened to my friend, in which WHAT HAD HAPPENED is the object, just as QUESTION in that book. I hope to know whether a native English speaker will consider such a sentence structure as incorrect.

In conversation, when I have said I ASKED A QUESTION and I want to continue the sentence with the name of the person I raised the question to, is there any way I can do it without changing the structure?
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
Without changing the structure, you would need to say 'One does not ask a question of a master who....'

Rover
 

nelson13

Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2012
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Zhuang
Home Country
Bangladesh
Current Location
Japan
Without changing the structure, you would need to say 'One does not ask a question of a master who....'

Rover

Thanks.
Usually dictionaries say this ASK SOMETHING OF SOMEONE structure is formal; so you think TO is not acceptable? (which means that book is wrong)
 

bhaisahab

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 12, 2008
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
Ireland
Thanks.
Usually dictionaries say this ASK SOMETHING OF SOMEONE structure is formal; so you think TO is not acceptable? (which means that book is wrong)

That's right, the book is wrong.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top