[General] one question, please

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Hello guys
I've got a question
can yo answer me please
when I tanslate a word like intrusion, there are more than preposition like on, upon and into with it
and my question is which one do I use?
are they all the same or different
 

emsr2d2

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Hello guys
I've got a question.
Can you answer [STRIKE]me[/STRIKE] it, please?
When I translate a word like intrusion, there are [STRIKE]more than[/STRIKE] several prepositions like on, upon and into that can be used with it.
[STRIKE]and[/STRIKE] My question is which one do I use?
Are they all the same or different?

I would say that we use "intrusion into" and "to intrude upon".

Brad Pitt has complained that the constant intrusion into his private life is very annoying.

I don't want to intrude upon this very private meeting, but it's important that I speak to you right now.
 

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thank you teacher for your respond, but what about on? and how do I define the correct preposition if a dictionary give me more than one. Also, let's take disappointed as an example
at/about (sth) and in/with (sb)
 

emsr2d2

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thank you teacher for your respond, but what about on? and how do I define the correct preposition if a dictionary give me more than one. Also, let's take disappointed as an example
at/about (sth) and in/with (sb)

When there is more than one preposition given, then it's just a case of learning which one to use when.

With your example, I don't think I would ever use "disappointed at", and "disappointed about" is frequently interchangeable with "disappointed with".

I'm disappointed about my exam results.
I'm disappointed with my exam results.

I'm disappointed with your behaviour. (A specific behaviour has caused you to be disappointed.)
I'm disappointed in you. (You expected more/a better result from this person, but they have let you down.)
 

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When there is more than one preposition given, then it's just a case of learning which one to use when.

With your example, I don't think I would ever use "disappointed at", and "disappointed about" is frequently interchangeable with "disappointed with".

I'm disappointed about my exam results.
I'm disappointed with my exam results.

I'm disappointed with your behaviour. (A specific behaviour has caused you to be disappointed.)
I'm disappointed in you. (You expected more/a better result from this person, but they have let you down.)


Thank you again, but I'm embarrassed to ask you if you have a good way to learn the usages of the prepositions of any word
By the way the dictionary gives examples about the words most the time
 

emsr2d2

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Thank you again, but I'm embarrassed to ask you if you have a good way to learn the usages of the prepositions of any word
By the way the dictionary gives examples about the words most the time

If the dictionary gives examples, that should be a lot of help. You'll just have to work out the context of each example, and then learn it!! I recommend learning an entire sentence each time, not just a small part of it. It makes almost everything easier to remember.
 

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If the dictionary gives examples, that should be a lot of help. You'll just have to work out the context of each example, and then learn it!! I recommend learning an entire sentence each time, not just a small part of it. It makes almost everything easier to remember.

If we talk about a word that got more than a meanings and I read a sentence that got the word. then I translate it(should I memorize all the meanings?
 

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If we talk about a word that got more than a meanings and I read a sentence that got the word. then I translate it(should I memorize all the meanings?

With words with multiple meanings, I think it's a good idea to memorise one sentence for each meaning so that you can be sure to use it in the correct context. It will also help you to recognise which meaning is being used if you read that word somewhere.
 

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With words with multiple meanings, I think it's a good idea to memorise one sentence for each meaning so that you can be sure to use it in the correct context. It will also help you to recognise which meaning is being used if you read that word somewhere.


Thank you very much that really helped me and sorry for bothering you
See you soon if you don't mind
 

emsr2d2

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You're welcome! Ask as many questions as you like on the forum. Never be embarrassed. If we don't ask, we don't learn!
 
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