Onomatopoeia expanded

Status
Not open for further replies.

bmo

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2003
Dear teachers,

Would you please elaborate what "through cultural inference" represents in the following sentence. I got it from the Internet:

Onomatopoeia:

"Strictly speaking, the formation or use of words which imitate sounds, like whispering, clang, and sizzle, but the term is generally expanded to refer to any word whose sound is suggestive of its meaning whether by imitation or through cultural inference. "

Thanks.

BMO
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
bmo said:
Dear teachers,

Would you please elaborate what "through cultural inference" represents in the following sentence. I got it from the Internet:

Onomatopoeia:

"Strictly speaking, the formation or use of words which imitate sounds, like whispering, clang, and sizzle, but the term is generally expanded to refer to any word whose sound is suggestive of its meaning whether by imitation or through cultural inference. "

Thanks.

BMO

Attached to culture. For example, in Poe's poem The Bells,

"tinkling" = sleigh bells;
"clanging" = fire bells;
"chiming" = wedding bells;
"tolling," "moaning," and "groaning" = funeral bells.

If someone from a non-English speaking background/culture were to read Poe's The Bells, s/he may not get the connections; those connections are part of the culture.
 

bmo

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2003
Casiopea said:
Attached to culture. For example, in Poe's poem The Bells,

"tinkling" = sleigh bells;
"clanging" = fire bells;
"chiming" = wedding bells;
"tolling," "moaning," and "groaning" = funeral bells.

If someone from a non-English speaking background/culture were to read Poe's The Bells, s/he may not get the connections; those connections are part of the culture.

Got it and thanks. I think in some central Asia cultures people rattle their tongue in mourning. Rattle would be a onomatopoeia.
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
bmo said:
Casiopea said:
Attached to culture. For example, in Poe's poem The Bells,

"tinkling" = sleigh bells;
"clanging" = fire bells;
"chiming" = wedding bells;
"tolling," "moaning," and "groaning" = funeral bells.

If someone from a non-English speaking background/culture were to read Poe's The Bells, s/he may not get the connections; those connections are part of the culture.

Got it and thanks. I think in some central Asia cultures people rattle their tongue in mourning. Rattle would be a onomatopoeia.

Very cool. 8)
In Japan, they've a million of 'em. My favo(u)rites include,

boo-boo (for 'your answer is incorrect', from the sound played on game shows) :lol: Interestingly enough, it's the same sound a pig makes, in Japan that is. :lol: In all fairness, though, English has oink-oink. :lol: :lol: wan-wan (the sound a dog makes) :shock: a labial sound "w" :?: Dogs have lip rounding :shock: ; yet English too has initial lip-rounding ([r]uff-ruff and ow-wow). Hmm. I wonder how that came to be? 8)
 

blacknomi

Key Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
In Taiwan,
birds 'Ju Ju' ( Ju in 'Jupiter' ) while yours chirp :shock:
crows 'a a' (a in 'father') What about Japan? :)
cows 'mo' ( mo in 'almost') while yours moo :D

It's funny to hear that pigs oink-onk and birds chirp-chirp.
Ah, birds have funny lips nowadays. :D :D :D :D :D
 
S

Susie Smith

Guest
blacknomi said:
In Taiwan,
birds 'Ju Ju' ( Ju in 'Jupiter' ) while yours chirp :shock:
crows 'a a' (a in 'father') What about Japan? :)
cows 'mo' ( mo in 'almost') while yours moo :D

It's funny to hear that pigs oink-onk and birds chirp-chirp.
Ah, birds have funny lips nowadays. :D :D :D :D :D

Cats purr.
Lions roar.
Owls hoot.
Bears snore.
Crickets creak.
Mice squeak.
Sheep baa.
But I speak!

Monkeys chatter.
Cows moo.
Ducks quack.
Doves coo.
Pigs squeal.
Horses neigh.
Chickens cluck.
But I say!

Flies hum.
Dogs growl.
Bats screech.
Coyotes howl.
Frogs croak.
Parrots squawk.
Bees buzz.
But I talk!

This poem by Arnold L. Shapiro is called "I Speak, I Say, I Talk". I ask my students to underline the regular verbs and then classify them according to the way the final "ed" is pronounced. It's fun to read out loud, too.

:lol:
 

blacknomi

Key Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
Susan,

You ROCK! That's it! That's what I need! It's a very good teaching material! I'll have my class get one tomorrow.

Thanks. <smack> :wink: :)
 

blacknomi

Key Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
Is there any link that has the sounds of water or sounds of the coins?

Like:
water-splash
gun-bang
when you win the casino, say 'Bingo'- d-ling d-ling :D



Dear BMO,
I am sorry to highjack your thread. :wink:
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top