Outdoor\outdoors

The children are playing ____.


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Tdol

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RonBee

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The one is an adjective and the other is a noun. You can have outdoor fun or you can have fun outdoors.

:D
 

Tdol

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Couldn't it be thought of as an adverb of place?-)
 

Casiopea

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tdol said:
Couldn't it be thought of as an adverb of place?-)

Cool.

outdoors < outside the doors (two doors, either in the front (double doors) or one in the front and one in the back or on the side of the house.)

The children are playing outdoors. (location)
The children are outdoors, playing. (location)

The children are outdoor. (ungram)
The children are out the door on their way to school.

:D
 

Tdol

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Casiopea said:
The children are playing outdoors. (location)
The children are outdoors, playing. (location)
:D

Here, is 'playing' a verb in the first and an adjective in the second? ;-)
 

RonBee

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tdol said:
Couldn't it be thought of as an adverb of place?-)

Yes.

:wink:
 

Casiopea

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tdol said:
Casiopea said:
The children are playing outdoors. (location)
The children are outdoors, playing. (location)
:D

Here, is 'playing' a verb in the first and an adjective in the second? ;-)

The children are playing. (verb)

The childern are outdoors. (adverb)
(They are situated outdoors)

The children are outdoors (adjective?) TEST:
The chidlren = outdoors (ungram)

The children are outdoorsy. (slang adjective, they like the outdoors)

:D
 

Tdol

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I meant 'playing' not 'outdoors'. ;-)
 

RonBee

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tdol said:
Casiopea said:
The children are playing outdoors. (location)
The children are outdoors, playing. (location)
:D

Here, is 'playing' a verb in the first and an adjective in the second? ;-)

I'd say adverb. I don't think playing modifies outdoors. What do you think?

:)
 

Tdol

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I'd say it is an adjective modifying the children. ;-)
 

RonBee

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tdol said:
I'd say it is an adjective modifying the children. ;-)

Would you say "The children are outdoors, playing" is the same as "The children are outdoors, and the children are playing"?

:)
 

Tdol

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They have the same meaning, but I feel that the comma moves it from a present participle as verb to one functionaing as an adjective. ;-)
 
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