Paint a picture

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me75

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I am at a loss for a word. I am looking for a word that describes a phrase that paints a picture (not always a pretty one). For example "raining cats and dogs" "She's the spit out of your mouth" "I paid an arm and a leg". The closest I came was idiom but I feel like there is a better, more specific word out there. Any advice?
 

twostep

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2004
me75 said:
I am at a loss for a word. I am looking for a word that describes a phrase that paints a picture (not always a pretty one). For example "raining cats and dogs" "She's the spit out of your mouth" "I paid an arm and a leg". The closest I came was idiom but I feel like there is a better, more specific word out there. Any advice?

Can you be more specific? What kind of picture do you want to paint?
 
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Susie Smith

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twostep said:
Francois said:
"Look up vivid and pictorial" was addressed to me75.

FRC

You lost me completely - waht is me75?

Me75 is the user who began this topic. All the examples he gave us are idioms. Me75, could you be a little more specific? Could you give us some more examples of what you really want?

For instance, are you talking about metaphors? (implied comparison)
Your words are razors to my wounded heart.

Similes? (direct comparison)
As for man, his days are as grass.

Or are you looking for vivid adjectives, as FRC supposed?
:)
 

Francois

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
Gentle is my second name.

I think he was looking for words expressing that a saying/idiom can conjure up strong images to the listener. Vivid and pictorial may be among the words he was looking for.

FRC
 

twostep

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2004
Francois said:
Gentle is my second name. Do you remember the Neil Diamond? I am a believer.........

I think he was looking for words expressing that a saying/idiom can conjure up strong images to the listener. Vivid and pictorial may be among the words he was looking for.

FRC

If he wants idioms we need more detail in reagrds to the situation.
 
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me75

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Clarification (I hope)

Francois said:
Gentle is my second name.

I think he was looking for words expressing that a saying/idiom can conjure up strong images to the listener. Vivid and pictorial may be among the words he was looking for.

FRC

EXACTLY! Sorry about the confusion. I will try to clarify but I'm not sure it will make sense. I was going to make a verb out of this word. The specific sentence I ended up using (but I still think there is a better word): "She is the spit out of your mouth", her mother idiomized.

Before you say anything, I realize idiomize is not a word. I knew from the beginning that I would be inventing a verb from this noun.

I still think, though, that there is a better word to describe such a descriptive (if gross) phrase.

Thanks for all of your help and sorry again for the confusion.
 

twostep

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2004
Re: Clarification (I hope)

me75 said:
Francois said:
Gentle is my second name.

I think he was looking for words expressing that a saying/idiom can conjure up strong images to the listener. Vivid and pictorial may be among the words he was looking for.

FRC

EXACTLY! Sorry about the confusion. I will try to clarify but I'm not sure it will make sense. I was going to make a verb out of this word. The specific sentence I ended up using (but I still think there is a better word): "She is the spit out of your mouth", her mother idiomized.

Before you say anything, I realize idiomize is not a word. I knew from the beginning that I would be inventing a verb from this noun.

I still think, though, that there is a better word to describe such a descriptive (if gross) phrase.

Thanks for all of your help and sorry again for the confusion.

I do not remember hearing that. Did you mean she is your spitting image?
 

Francois

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
Yeah, the "spit out of your mouth" sounds weird out of context. Looks like "spitting image" indeed. Anyway, English being a wonderfully dynamic language, you can always coin new verbs, like idiomize, but you must know what you're doing, because the listener will think you made a mistake or may not understand you. Specifically, "idiomize" doesn't look terrific to me. I would suggest sticking to an existing verb and using an adverb instead.

FRC
 

twostep

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2004
Francois said:
Yeah, the "spit out of your mouth" sounds weird out of context. Looks like "spitting image" indeed. Anyway, English being a wonderfully dynamic language, you can always coin new verbs, like idiomize, but you must know what you're doing, because the listener will think you made a mistake or may not understand you. Specifically, "idiomize" doesn't look terrific to me. I would suggest sticking to an existing verb and using an adverb instead.

FRC

Christmas and New Years on one day! Francois agrees with me on something.
 
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