Pay off and worth

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Ju

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1. All the hard work I had done over the summer paid off.

2. It's worth to work hard over the summer because your work has succeeded.

I try to make sentences with the words "pay off" and "worth" because they sound very close in meaning to me.

Are the above two sentences correct grammatically in the same meaning?

Thanks.
 

teechar

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1. All the hard work I had done over the summer paid off.
That's grammatical, but do you have a particular reason for using the past perfect?

2. It's worth it to work hard over the summer because your work has succeeded.
That's grammatical now, but it's still not natural.

I try to make sentences with the words "pay off" and "worth" because they sound very close in meaning to me.
Here, we see a more serious (and very common) problem. The tense is missing! Consider "I'm trying", "I tried", "I've tried" or "I've been trying", for example.

Are the above two sentences [STRIKE]correct[/STRIKE] grammatical, and do they have [STRIKE]ly in[/STRIKE] the same meaning?
Thanks.
The expressions "worth it" and "paid off" are close, but they're not necessarily interchangeable.

For example,

Don't be upset by what she did. She's not worth it. [Here, "pay/paid off" wouldn't work.]
Their strategy paid off at the end, and the business started making a profit. [Here, "worth it" wouldn't work.]
 

Ju

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Dear Teechar,

"She's not worth it."

It means "she is not worth it." because "worth" is an adjective. Am I correct?

Thanks.
 
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Matthew Wai

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teechar

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Dear Teechar,

"She's not worth it."

It means "she is not worth it." because "worth" is an adjective. Am I correct?

Thanks.
Yes.
 

Rover_KE

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"She's not worth it."

It means "She is not worth it", because "worth" is an adjective. Am I correct?
`
 

Ju

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I think it is grammatical if 'worthwhile' is used instead of 'worth'.


See the rule below.

Dear Matthew,

I don't understand the rule that you mentioned?

Ju
 
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