Phrasal Verb Dictionary

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan

Wuisi

Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
:oops:Sorry, I didn't notice.
Then, it's perfect. Superb job:up::up::up::up:
Regards.
 

Batfink

Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2008
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
Ireland
Current Location
China
By definition phrasal verbs are used more in informal texts and speech. However, in a less formal world, more and more are being used in business exchanges and in various media. The only real way to learn more and more phrasal verbs is to listen to more and more English. Many listening texts are available through websites such as the BBC language department (also included would be the applicable scripts). Also, start watching English language films (use subtitles) and collect songs (find the lyrics with Google). With songs and films, not only are they an extremely enjoyable way to learn, but, the language items used are MEMORABLE.

Phrasal verbs can be learned very positively through the context of the medium.
 

sarnicki

Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Hi
Would you recommend me any workbooks focusing on phrasal verbs (or websites) - i mean exercises, exercises and of course exercises. The problem is that any dictionary cannot replace the practicing of verbs. And the disadvantage of movies is that you have to lose to much time to catch any phrasal verb. From my point of view it's better to learn phrasal verbs by exercising them and later only to try to find/re-learn them by watching tv or so.
So, recommendations pl:shock:ease. (in my case upper intermediate level);
PS
same refers to idioms as well
PS
is any serious difference between get round to and get down to?
 

epinto@vodafone.es

New member
Joined
Nov 12, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Catalan
Home Country
Spain
Current Location
Spain
is there any place where I can find a complete list of Phrasal verbs?
 

sarnicki

Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
I don't think there is possible to create a 'complete list of phrasal verbs' - they create very informal, forever changing language.

Answering my question: I found as far 'Phrasal Verb Organiser' practice book by John Flower - there are over 700 verbs with 1000 meanings. If anyone knows any other titles, please, let me know.
 

mamoun abbas

New member
Joined
Dec 30, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
hi am mamoun from sudan .will help me out to speak englis.here is my no 00919952212198
 

HanibalII

Member
Joined
May 9, 2012
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
English
Home Country
Australia
Current Location
Australia
This is fantastic. Thanks for the dictionary. :up:
 

Claudia Braga

New member
Joined
May 5, 2015
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Brazilian Portuguese
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Hi, I'm new here.
There is in the site how know the pharasal verbs separable and inseparable or detai of what are separable or inseparable?
thanks

Claudia
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
If a verb is inseparable, you cannot put a word like the object between the verb and the particle (preposition, etc). For example, you can come into money, meaning inherit. It is inseparable, so you cannot [strike]come money into[/strike]. Some verbs have an option- you can turn off the light, or turn the light off. With these verbs that have the option, we separate when we use a pronoun and always say turn it off, not [strike]turn off it[/strike].
 

LauraMijas

New member
Joined
May 7, 2016
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
Spanish
Home Country
Spain
Current Location
Spain
Hello , I´d like to know if there exists a phrasal verbs dictionary in which I "type" a phrase and instead of a definition I get a phrasal verb; for example I type "seek/search for" and I get "to look for".
Not an online dictionary, but I mean a "physical" dictionary.
Thank you very much.
 

charliedeut

VIP Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2009
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Spanish
Home Country
Spain
Current Location
Spain
Welcome to the Forum, Laura :hi:

If you want to type, you need an online dictionary. If you want a "physical" dictionary, I'm afraid there's seldom a chance you can type anything there.

As far as I know, online dictionaries only let you type the main verb. Then you have to (usually) scroll down to find the phrasal verb you're looking for (I have not checked ALL dictionaries, to be sure, and I don't know if Longman has an online equivalent of their Longman Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs (or any other such book from any other editing house or university, for that matter).
 
Top