phrasal verb "drive back"

Status
Not open for further replies.

ivygreen

Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2007
Member Type
Student or Learner
Please give me an example sentence, using
"drive back" (meaning: return by car) as the
inseparable phrasal verb?
 

new2grammar

Senior Member
Joined
May 5, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Punjabi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
Please give me an example sentence, using
"drive back" (meaning: return by car) as the
inseparable phrasal verb?

Hope it helps

sentence 1.
We then thought we’d drive back through Richmond Park, maybe finding a place to stop in there and have our picnic but the place was full of Sunday drivers so we drove back home and had our picnic on the living room floor.

Sentence 2.
....After the move, says Lucy Cisneros, the couple continued to drive back into Globe to see their doctor.

Sentence 3:
Despite the speed, Father Nieuwland had spotted a new plant along the road, and he insisted his friend drive back five miles to get it.
 

BobK

Harmless drudge
Staff member
Joined
Jul 29, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Hope it helps

sentence 1.
We then thought we’d drive back through Richmond Park, maybe finding a place to stop in there and have our picnic but the place was full of Sunday drivers so we drove back home and had our picnic on the living room floor.

Sentence 2.
....After the move, says Lucy Cisneros, the couple continued to drive back into Globe to see their doctor.

Sentence 3:
Despite the speed, Father Nieuwland had spotted a new plant along the road, and he insisted his friend drive back five miles to get it.
:up: Interesting... I've just seen that there are two* meanings here -
  • "go back [possibly using another form of transport]": I plan to take the train to the pub where I left the car last night, and then drive back.

  • "retrace a route immediately" - as in your third example.

b

PS * Apart, that is, from meanings that don't involve cars at all: 'drive back a rabid dog with a stick', 'drive back the boundaries of popular science'...
 
Last edited:

mfwills

Junior Member
Joined
May 8, 2008
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
:up: Interesting... I've just seen that there are two* meanings here -
  • "go back [possibly using another form of transport]": I plan to take the train to the pub where I left the car last night, and then drive back.

  • "retrace a route immediately" - as in your third example.
Not two meanings, but rather two forms of the same concept: they both mean "to return to a certain point," both using self-directed transport.
 

BobK

Harmless drudge
Staff member
Joined
Jul 29, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
[/LIST]
Not two meanings, but rather two forms of the same concept: they both mean "to return to a certain point," both using self-directed transport.

Well that's a matter of opinion ;-). Father Nieuwland wouldn't have been satisfied if the driver had driven back to the same point (on the main road) by way of a side-road running parallel. Maybe he would, in the unlikely event that he knew precisely where the plant was. But if he thought 'It's on this road, about 5 mls back - I'll know when we get to it' he'd want to travel specifically on the same road.

The more important point, though, that I missed yesterday, is that it's not a phrasal verb at all. 'Drive back' often is - as in the examples in my PS. But when you "drive back down a road" or "back towards the spectators", "drive" is just a verb with an adverb phrase that starts with a preposition - as in 'up the hill' or 'down the lane' or 'across the plain'...

b
 

new2grammar

Senior Member
Joined
May 5, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Punjabi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
Well that's a matter of opinion ;-). Father Nieuwland wouldn't have been satisfied if the driver had driven back to the same point (on the main road) by way of a side-road running parallel. Maybe he would, in the unlikely event that he knew precisely where the plant was. But if he thought 'It's on this road, about 5 mls back - I'll know when we get to it' he'd want to travel specifically on the same road.

The more important point, though, that I missed yesterday, is that it's not a phrasal verb at all. 'Drive back' often is - as in the examples in my PS. But when you "drive back down a road" or "back towards the spectators", "drive" is just a verb with an adverb phrase that starts with a preposition - as in 'up the hill' or 'down the lane' or 'across the plain'...

b

Hi Bob well you are right it is a matter of opinion :cool:
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top