phrases with words having same origins

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Joe

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Dec 31, 2003
I've long heard a rule that we do not use words with the same orgin in a phrase. For example, some argue that the following do not work:

enjoy your enjoyment;
plant a plant;
compose a composition;
write some writings;
...the contestant who won the contest;

After all the material I have read so far, I only know of one exception: we can say, "dream your dream". Is there a rule about phrases like this? Could you give me some more examples? Thanks. :)
 

A.Russell

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Jun 14, 2004
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New Zealand
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Thailand
Joe said:
I've long heard a rule that we do not use words with the same orgin in a phrase. For example, some argue that the following do not work:

enjoy your enjoyment;
plant a plant;
compose a composition;
write some writings;
...the contestant who won the contest;

After all the material I have read so far, I only know of one exception: we can say, "dream your dream". Is there a rule about phrases like this? Could you give me some more examples? Thanks. :)

I think they just sound poetic, not really incorrect. Change writings to writing.

For the most part, it is not that they are wrong, just that there is no point in saying them. For example, if you say that you composed something, we know it is a composition, so why say it?
 

Joe

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Joined
Dec 31, 2003
A.Russell said:
I think they just sound poetic, not really incorrect. Change writings to writing.

For the most part, it is not that they are wrong, just that there is no point in saying them. For example, if you say that you composed something, we know it is a composition, so why say it?

I get your point. Maybe my mother tongue is working here. Because in Chinese, we do say something like "enjoy your enjoyment", literally. And maybe I gave poor examples, not enough to specify my question. Anyway, thanks. :)
 

Casiopea

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Sep 21, 2003
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Other
Joe said:
I've long heard a rule that we do not use words with the same orgin in a phrase. For example, some argue that the following do not work:

enjoy your enjoyment;
plant a plant;
compose a composition;
write some writings;
...the contestant who won the contest;

After all the material I have read so far, I only know of one exception: we can say, "dream your dream". Is there a rule about phrases like this? Could you give me some more examples? Thanks. :)

The term you're looking for is semantic redundancy, e.g., "Dream your dream", a catch-phrase, which is possibly the reason some might feel it's more acceptable than the others.

All the best, :D
 
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