Please rate my accent and pronunciation

JohnJD

New member
Joined
Nov 9, 2021
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Spanish
Home Country
Colombia
Current Location
Colombia
I have these 2 files, could you please judge both? which one sounds "better" also could you guess where I'm from?

This was the script used:

"As the pen fell far to the floor, Amy watched it hit the linoleum. She knew she couldn't have caught that pen if Brian threw it to her from his greasy old hands. But she picked it up and wrote the directions to her house. She cleared her throat, but her words still sounded hoarse. "This is the best route. Keep your horse to this path, and you'll be fine. After you cross the creek, be careful of the large roots that come up out of the ground. We'll have a cot set up in the guest house for you." Amy handed the pen back to Brian. She wanted to wash her hands immediately, but settled on wiping them on her jeans. The look on Brian's face when she did this sent a pin-pricking sensation through her. She knew she shouldn't be so hard on him. After all, she thought, he is my brother. I shouldn't be so angry all the time. And he is doing us a great service by helping us out this summer. "Thanks again, Brian. I'll see you in the morning. Travel safe." Brian nodded to his sister. He did not attempt to extend his calloused, dirty hand to her. But he smiled, knowing that at least she had begun to trust him again."

Any suggestions? Thanks guys for all your help!

https://voca.ro/1h9Jre3I3vEj
https://voca.ro/1oKzgKacKnSu
 
Last edited by a moderator:

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Welcome to the forum. :hi:

Before we continue, please tell us the source and author of the quote you used for the recording.

I hate to take the mystery out of your game, but we don't need to guess where you're from. Your member profile says you're from Colombia and are a native Spanish speaker. I would have guessed that anyway, mainly from the fact that you add an "e" sound to the start of words beginning with "s". I used to teach in Spain so I instantly notice that mistake.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
Record yourself speaking naturally- reading texts is not a natural way to show your pronunciation. Also, record things a bit louder. Tell us about your first English lesson, without a script.
 

Skrej

Key Member
Joined
May 11, 2015
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I instantly recognized it as a Spanish accent, just be 95% of our student demographic is Hispanic. In addition to the 'e-before s' giveaway, I heard a few instances of /th/ being pronounced as /t/, as well as some i/e vowel confusion - all common earmarks of native Spanish speakers talking in English. You also still has some lapses with word stress, which is a common problem I hear as well.

Spanish is a syllable timed language where every syllable gets roughly equal time. English is a stress timed language, where the time between stressed syllables is roughly equal and non-stressed syllables get a reduced amount of time. Stressed syllables get stretched while unstressed get compressed so that there's approximately the same amount of time between stress, versus giving each syllable equal time. It's a really difficult adjustment to make when your first language and 2nd language differ in that way.

You also have some unnatural pauses at places we wouldn't expect them. Part of that may be language intonation errors, but it might also just stem from the fact you're reading. As Tdol mentioned, it's hard to judge pronunciation from reading alone.

Of the two, your first recording was more consistent with the intonation. Both were about the same in terms of pronunciation. Still, overall you're quite understandable. ESL teachers tend to have a more attuned ear and understand learners better than the average person on the street who may not be used to dealing with L1 influence, but I still the the average non-teacher would have only minimal difficulty understanding your reading.

Again though, as Tdol said, a better judgement would be a sample of you just casually talking. That way, we can hear if you make any grammatical errors when you're forced to produce your own structures versus reading ones that are supplied to you.

Just pick a topic that you don't have to think about much, so that you can concentrate on talking without having to stop and think about what you're going to say. Good examples are childhood memories, family stories, travel experiences, important events in your life, etc. Anything where you're basically just reciting details and not having to compose new ideas.
 
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