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FW

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1-This discovery throws new light on diseases of the heart.
2-This discovery throws new light on heart diseases.

In which sentence does the discovery throw light on ALL heart diseases and in which sentence on SOME heart diseases. May-be one can't just tell?
 

RonBee

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There is no indication to me that either sentence "throws light" on all heart diseases. Possibly he is talking about heart disease in general, but no discovery is going to advance the understanding of all heart diseases. In any case, the sentence (either one) doesn't say that that discovery does that.
 

Casiopea

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1-This discovery throws new light on diseases of the heart.
2-This discovery throws new light on heart diseases.

In which sentence does the discovery throw light on ALL heart diseases and in which sentence on SOME heart diseases. May-be one can't just tell?

I agree with RonBee.

However, it's a rather very interesting quasi-tautology. That is, it's not really a tautology at all.

Consider pausing (...) after the word 'diseases' and before its object 'of the heart':

1. This discovery throws new light on diseases....of the heart.

(Not ALL diseases, only SOME diseases, specifically those belonging to the heart.)

Now consider, the word 'heart' as part of the noun phrase 'diseases':

2. This discovery throws news light on heart diseases.

(All heart diseases, specifically those belonging to the heart.)

:twisted:
 

makaveli

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Casiopea said:
However, it's a rather very interesting quasi-tautology. That is, it's not really a tautology at all.

Not wishing to cast doubt on any of your English usage Casiopea which I have found impeccable, merely that reading this sentence I must say I have never heard or read this phrasing before!!!!!

Maybe the fact it came from such a distinguished poster, may have been why it appeared to stand out to me!!

I have always seen,used or heard "However, It's a rather interesting quasi-tautology".................

OR:

"However it's a very interesting quasi-tautology"..........


I don't know what anyone else thinks, just that it sounds as if it trips over itself a little !!!!

I am not trying to play :evil: either, honest!!!!! :p



Mak.
 

Casiopea

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Casiopea scratched out:
...it's a rather very interesting quasi-tautology.


Makaveli kindly provided:
I have always seen, used or heard

"However, It's a rather interesting quasi-tautology"

OR

"However it's a very interesting quasi-tautology"

Yer'right there. It should have read 'It's rather a very...." :oops:

Sometimes my fingers tend to be four or five strokes ahead of my brain--or is it behind?. Why that is, I dunno. I secretly believe, though, that they're trying to rewrite the English language. They even have a spelling mind of there own :evil: :lol:

Appreciatively,

Cas
 
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